Carthusian


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Carthusian

RC Church
a. a member of an austere monastic order founded by Saint Bruno in 1084 near Grenoble, France
b. (as modifier): a Carthusian monastery
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1098, fifty years after the establishing of the Carthusian Charterhouse, the Benedictines in response to extreme Carthusian asceticism on one hand and in reaction against the pomp and worldliness of the Cluniac Order on the other--the Cluniacs being a group that had set themselves apart from traditional Benedictine practice with an autocratic organization centered in the Abbey of Cluny--founded the order of Cistercians in an effort to reinstate the life of the first Benedictines at Monte Cassino.
A recipient of the 2011 Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Publication Award for a Manuscript in Italian Literary Studies, Demetrio Yocum presents Petrarch's writings, including personal correspondence and journal entries, to argue for Petrarch's intimate relationship with the Carthusian order, and to make a case for Carthusianism's intellectual and spiritual influence on Petrarch's humanism, and how this humanism in turn shaped the Renaissance.
In Olivier Cullin's chapter on notations in Carthusian liturgical books, he shows, by means of excellent illustrations, that there is notational unity amongst Carthusian manuscripts, namely a trend towards 'a heavier and more vertical quadratic writing'.
Mitchell, among others, to elucidate the texts, or "imagetexts" (a term coined by Mitchell to describe film and photographic essays), in the Carthusian Miscellany.
Perhaps even beyond the intentions of the author, the book transports readers into other worlds and to other times: that other time that the author intended to make vivid is the monastery; the world the monastery claimed to keep alive is the eleventh-century world of the founder figure of the Carthusian order, Bruno of Cologne.
If life moves with a studied slowness at the Grand Chartreuse monastery in the French Alps, head monastery of the Carthusian order, so, too, does "Into Great Silence.
Vincent Gillespie returns to the original audience for the Mirror, written by a Carthusian scribe, and makes a case for a reassessment of the view that Carthusians actively circulated texts among the laity.
In February 1999, I started to research An Infinity of Little Hours, a book about the life of Carthusian hermit monks.
INTO GREAT SILENCE (U, 164 mins) is an epic documentary which delves into the largely silent, reclusive world of Carthusian monks in a French monastery.
Describing "Mademoiselle Acarie and her circle," the author explores the likelihood that Acarie drew on a variety of medieval sources to formulate a Christocentric vision of a contemplative life outside the cloister and did not merely follow in the footsteps of influential contemporary clerics such as Benoit de Canfield or the Carthusian Richard Beaucousin.
With almost no dialogue, Silence reveals the life of monks in the Grande Chartreuse monastery hidden in the French Alps, where they have kept their Carthusian monastic rule since 1084 when they were founded by St.
Groening approached the Grand Prior of the Carthusian Order for permission to shoot inside the Great Charterhouse, high up in the French Alps, in the late 1980s, but was told his request was premature.