Cartularies


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal.

Cartularies

 

collections of copies of the documents legally registering gifts, primarily of land, for the use of the church in medieval Western Europe. Copies of royal grants and sometimes copies of agreements between secular persons were also included in the cartularies. The copies did not always agree with the originals. The earliest examples of cartularies date to the late seventh and the eighth centuries; they ceased to be compiled in the late 13th and the 14th centuries. The cartularies of the large monasteries often contain thousands of documents. Cartularies are one of the most important sources for the investigation of the social and economic processes of the feudal countryside. Such data as the size and structure of the landholdings of the various social strata, the duties of the peasants, and the means by which the feudal dependence of the peasants was formed can be determined from the cartularies.

In the broadest sense, cartularies were understood in the Middle Ages to be collections of any sort of documents.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The intricacies of the documents preserved in the Worcester cartularies are the subject of the book's fourth chapter, which examines the administration and tenurial history of Worcester's estates in the late Anglo-Saxon and early Norman period.
With Old English there is the additional complication that most of the anchor texts, which are charter boundaries, are not extant in contemporary manuscripts, so one has to keep a weather eye open for possible contamination by cartulary copyists; but that is not usually a problem, because cartularies up to the mid-thirteenth century on the whol e copy tenth- and eleventh-century texts more accurately than do tenth-and eleventh-century literary manuscripts.
The present volume provides a full English calendar of the manuscript, together with an introduction providing background on the Pakenham family, and an illuminating who's who of the many people mentioned in it, although as very few lay cartularies have survived, it is a pity the editor did not include any discussion of them, which would have helped to provide some context.
However, an important element in the book is the material derived from the private documents relating to the Carrara and their leading subjects, preserved in a number of notarial cartularies.
The pursuant discussion turns from religious literature to the evidence of pancartes and cartularies while maintaining the themes developed in association with the former.
Jordan employs the full panoply of medieval sources, from chronicles to cartularies, records of government to building accounts and medieval songs.
Its importance lies in its being one of the very few surviving cartularies from English nunneries and in its consequent value for the study of women religious, especially in the later Middle Ages.
There is a wealth of materials on schooling and teaching that awaits systematic study in the Florentine archives: above all fiscal records (the prestanze and catasto), and notarial cartularies.
Working in the tradition of Kirshner and Molho, Kuehn uses the vast riches of the Florentine State Archives, especially the notarial cartularies, to elucidate the reality of social history through the example of concrete documents of human interaction reflected in legal consilia, arbitration, litigation, wills, and similar materials.
Saints' lives, chronicles, cartularies, archaeological evidence, and other sources provide vivid detail that puts flesh on the bones of the material from the customaries.
The sources range from standard monastic sources, cartularies, foundation charters, and the like to royal chronicles, Cathedral registers, wills, sermons, miracle stories and canonization records, and diplomatic texts.
The arrangement of the cartularies is maintained in the printed version, and where there is duplication of material the better text (usually the Chatsworth MS, which includes witnesses and dating clauses) has been preferred.