Charvak

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Charvak

 

an urban-type settlement in Bostanlyk Raion, Tashkent Oblast, Uzbek SSR. Charvak is situated on the Chirchik River, a tributary of the Syr Darya. The terminus of a railroad branch line from Tashkent, Charvak was established in 1964 during the construction of the Charvak Hydroelectric Power Plant.

References in periodicals archive ?
One of them is a verse associated with the Carvaka tradition of Indian philosophy (no.
8) For classic examples of this skeptical critique of causality in the Eastern and Western philosophical traditions, see the surviving texts of the ancient Indian Carvaka school (A Sourcebook in Indian Philosophy, ed.
Similarmente, los representantes [de la filosofia] nyaya han inventado otras maneras [de expresarse acerca de la mente], y tambien los representantes [de la filosofia] samkhya han inventado otras maneras e incluso para los carvaka hay otros modos [de expresion].
Uniqueness of Carvaka Philosophy in Traditional Indian Thought.
He adds that Buddhism was agnostic, the Carvaka and Lokayata philosophies of the atheist schools generated extensive arguments about materialism (Sen: Spring 1997).
Sen refers to the powerful effect of the Lokayata and Carvaka schools of thought from the first millennium CE which encouraged open debate, and supported the Mughal emperor Akbar in his famous open multi-religious dialogues in the late sixteenth century.
Las escuelas nastikas son budista, jaina y carvaka.
European historians of Indian thought tended to forget that there had been many pre-vedic, non-vedic and even anti-vedic schools of thought which were quite popular with the people (Lokayata, Carvaka, Kapalika, etc.
Its heritage traces back to the philosophers and poets of ancient Greece and Rome, Confucian China, and the Carvaka movement in classical India.
In mid-second millennium doxographies in Sanskrit, the latter two groups are lumped together with Saivas as belonging among the "affirmer" (astika) schools, in contradistinction to the Buddhist and Carvaka "denier" (nastika) schools.
Haribhadra's work enumerates six (although he acknowledges that a seventh, the Carvaka school of materialism, might also be included).
6-9, 85), one that classes all of these traditions, along with the Nyaya of Gautama and the Vaisesika of Kapila, as astika or "orthodox" traditions--this in opposition to Advaita Vedanta, Buddhism, Jainism, the materialist Carvaka school, and (by implication) Islam (pp.