Castilian

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Castilian

the Spanish dialect of Castile; the standard form of European Spanish
References in periodicals archive ?
The potential repercussions of the extrinsic pressure of both standard Portuguese and Castilian must also be considered in terms of ideological iconization and erasure--the former involving standardization and hence achievement of symbolic status for particular linguistic traits which serve to distinguish Galician from Portuguese or Castilian, the latter implying intentional or incidental diminution of Galician forms or variants that do not correspond well with the Portuguese or Castilian standard by giving these no official recognition or censuring them outright.
Clearly, Catalan does not appear to be on equal footing with Castilian in terms of everyday use, perhaps partly due to the language's strong association with ethnic identity.
One might suppose that the prominence of Castilian, i.
No English writer before or since has surpassed Ford's description in the 1840s of the diversities of Spain's peoples, landscapes, and climates, but like Borrow and Washington Irving, his love of the picturesque and his romanticism helped to create an Anglo-Saxon image of Spain which reflected mainly Andalusian colour and Castilian dignity.
The second is the new prominence and assertiveness of the Catalan language, even if much of Barcelona remains equally at home in Castilian and the many immigrants drawn from elsewhere in Spain by economic opportunities have not taken to their hearts the local language.
Such points matter because, as THOMAS intriguingly speculates, had the Mexica state survived long enough to accommodate the Castilians and their epidemics, the later history of the region might have resembled British India or Meiji Japan.
Finally, the gender of the word in Castilian (aguila) was also, conveniently, feminine.
In many instances Talavera suggests that these qualities had been lacking in Castilian leadership and anticipates the later criticisms that Isabel's chroniclers launched against Enrique.
In contrast to Reformation Europe, the inexpensive, mass-produced primers, catechisms and religious pamphlets that were eagerly consumed by Castilians of all strata promoted not dissent but conformity to Tridentine doctrine.
Drawing on years of research in the archives of the Castilian diocese of Cuenca, Nalle traces the transformation of the magical, intercessory faith of the Middle Ages into the complex mixture of ritual observance, social control, and popular religious enthusiasm that made up Tridentine piety.