casuistry

(redirected from Casuists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.

casuistry

(kăzh`yo͞oĭstrē) [Lat., casus=case], art of applying general moral law to particular cases. Although most often associated with theology (it has been utilized since the inception of Christianity), it is also used in law and psychology. The function of casuistry is to analyze motives so individual judgments can be made in accordance with an established moral code. The term is often used in a pejorative sense to indicate specious or equivocal reasoning.

casuistry

Philosophy the resolution of particular moral dilemmas, esp those arising from conflicting general moral rules, by careful distinction of the cases to which these rules apply
References in periodicals archive ?
What he wrote about the casuists might be applied to those responsible for the content of The Federal Register: "That frivolous accuracy which they attempted to introduce into subjects which do not admit of it, almost necessarily betrayed them into those dangerous errors [such as chicaning with our consciences and evading the most essential articles of our duty], and at the same time rendered their works dry and disagreeable" (TMS, 339-40).
The fearful Jesuit morality, explained (and practised) by its casuists, with its mental restrictions and its subtleties, its equivocations and its condescensions, seeped in everywhere, like a slow poison; it disrupted society morally, it broke up the spirit of the family, it corrupted the conscience with constant swings in the notion of duty, and destroyed the character by deceiving and weakening it.
The casuists presaged another emerging group of bioethicists who call themselves "pragmatic" bioethicists.
Crosignani examines in a detailed yet concise manner how casuists proposed the liceity of a third option.
Bireley introduces a modern and schematic division between "holy war" (a providential war, involving a divine call) and a "religious war" (one merely fought for the advancement or defence of religion); this division obscures more subtle distinctions made by seventeenth-century casuists and theologians.
Casuists and particularists emphasize the inadequacies of such theories for real-life decision-making and conclude that efforts to systematize and find general theoretical justification for our moral choices and judgments are misconceived.
62) As we have seen, the medieval ecclesiastical chancellor could be regarded as being authoritative on matters of conscience--something about which Protestant casuists complained.
And according to these various states and textures of actions to be done or omitted, the decisions are more difficult and inevident, and the variety of Mens Judgments give different Theorys and make different Conclusions touching them: And therefore to settle and determine these (r) is required much exercise of the reasoning faculty, much Judgment and advertence which doth not so commonly fall under ordinary Capacities, this we may easily perceive in the curious and subtile Works of Many Writers of Morall Philosophy and in the (a) Schoolmen (b) and Casuists of this and /fol.
With vast erudition and a sharp understanding of the complexity of the subject, Gay explains in great detail the evolution of the moral discourse during the 17th century in France, and the partial victory of the rigorists over the casuists and their "morale relachee" (lax morals).
All the major casuists of the seventeenth century (William Perkins, William Ames, Joseph Hall, Robert Sanderson, and Jeremy Taylor) discussed "matrimonial cases.