ablation

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ablation

1. Medicine the surgical removal of an organ, structure, or part
2. Astronautics the melting or wearing away of an expendable part, such as the heat shield of a space re-entry vehicle on passing through the earth's atmosphere
3. Geology the wearing away of a rock or glacier

ablation

(ab-lay -shŏn) The loss of material from the surface of a moving body as a result of vaporization, friction, etc. For example, atmospheric atoms and molecules erode the surface of a meteoroid and damage the protective heat shield of a returning space shuttle.

Ablation

 

in glaciology, the wasting of the mass of a glacier or snow cover as a result of thawing, evaporation, or mechanical removal—for example, wind ablation or the falling of icebergs. It is caused chiefly by climatic factors.

Three types of ablation are distinguished according to place of appearance: subglacial (or bottom), internal, and surface. The internal heat of the earth, springs (particularly warm ones) surfacing in the glacier bed, and heat caused by the friction of the glacier in its bed are some of the causes of subglacial ablation. Internal ablation is caused by friction between the glacier components and by the circulation of water and air. The glacier surface receives warmth predominantly from solar radiation and from the air. The thermal balance of the glacier surface is the basis of all surface ablation processes. The term “ablation” is sometimes used as well as a synonym for “surface washoff.”

ablation

[ə′blā·shən]
(aerospace engineering)
The intentional removal of material from a nose cone or spacecraft during high-speed movement through a planetary atmosphere to provide thermal protection to the underlying structure.
(geology)
The wearing away of rocks, as by erosion or weathering.
(hydrology)
The reduction in volume of a glacier due to melting and evaporation.
(medicine)
The removal of tissue or a part of the body by surgery, such as by excision or amputation.
References in periodicals archive ?
This market is segmented, on the basis of surgical procedures, into catheter ablation and surgical ablation.
In catheter ablation, an electrophysiologist inserts a catheter (thin flexible tube) in a groin artery and guides it through blood vessels to the heart.
Providing doctors with contact force stability when applying RF against the heart wall during catheter ablation has been shown to improve outcomes as inconsistent tissue contact may result in incomplete lesion formation that could result in the need for additional treatment, and too much contact may result in tissue injury, which may lead to complications.
EHRA/HRS Expert Consensus on Catheter Ablation of Ventricular Arrhythmias: developed in a partnership with the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), a Registered Branch of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS); in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA).
Founded in Geneva in 2003, Endosense is a medical technology company focused on improving the efficacy, safety and accessibility of catheter ablation for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias.
We are excited to be involved in evaluating this ground-breaking catheter ablation option that has the potential to improve upon the current standard of care.
Earlier trials had found that up to 6 percent of patients getting catheter ablation experienced serious complications such as a heart puncture, blood clotting or damage to nearby nerves or to the esophagus.
Catheter ablation as definitive treatment for AF has evolved over a relatively short time from an experimental procedure to an important therapeutic option that provides cure or significant palliation in the majority of patients, with acceptable complication rates at high-volume centers with experienced providers.
Despite the dramatic increase in the number of catheter ablation procedures performed for atrial fibrillation (AF)--a cardiac arrhythmia that involves the two upper chambers (atria) of the heart, and their success rate, there is little consensus on the mechanisms involved in AF.
You don't say how long ago these procedures were tried, but there have been many improvements in catheter ablation over the past few years.
But Prof Camm, a professor of cardiology with the British Heart Foundation, said the catheter ablation should stop the problem returning in the future.
Last February, the voice was silenced after Pecaro underwent a new surgery called catheter ablation.