Catullus


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Catullus

(Caius Valerius Catullus) (kətŭl`əs), 84? B.C.–54? B.C., Roman poet, b. Verona. Of a well-to-do family, he went c.62 B.C. to Rome. He fell deeply in love, probably with Clodia, sister of Cicero's opponent Publius Clodius. She was suspected of murdering her husband. Catullus wrote to his beloved, addressed as Lesbia (to recall Sappho of Lesbos), a series of superb little poems that run from early passion and tenderness to the hatred and disillusionment that overwhelmed him after his mistress was faithless. Of the 116 extant poems attributed to him, three (18–20) are almost certainly spurious. They include, besides the Lesbia poems, poems to his young friend Juventius; epigrams, ranging from the genial to the obscenely derisive; elegies; a few long poems, notably "Attis" and a nuptial poem honoring Thetis and Peleus; and various short pieces. His satire is vigorous and flexible, his light poems joyful and full-bodied. He was influenced by the Alexandrians and drew much on the Greeks for form and meter, but his genius outran all models. Catullus is one of the greatest lyric poets of all time. Two of his most popular poems are the 10-line poem, touching and simple, which ends, "frater ave atque vale" [hail, brother, and farewell], and "On the Death of Lesbia's Sparrow."

Bibliography

See translations by R. Myers and R. J. Ormsby (1970), C. Martin (1990), and P. Green (2005); studies by A. L. Wheeler (1934, repr. 1964), T. Frank (1928, repr. 1965), K. Quinn (1959, 1970, and 1972), R. Jenkyns (1982), T. P. Wiseman (1985), J. Ferguson (1988), and C. Martin (1992).

Catullus

Gaius Valerius . ?84--?54 bc, Roman lyric poet, noted particularly for his love poems
References in periodicals archive ?
Allius provided Catullus and his beloved with a domus to share their love (line 68), the domus of Laodamia and Protesilaus was frustra incepta (line 75), and the domus of the Valerii Catulli "died" with Catullus' brother in Troy (line 94).
Hughes had gone for a touch when the four-year-old disappointed on his latest start, but there was no mistake this time as Tony McCoy drove Catullus home four lengths clear of Weet U There.
The articulation of the labyrinth in the essa y depends upon an intertextual reconstruction: the folds of the building appear in all their detail only through the dialogic commerce the French text engages with a long and complex poem of Catullus, a poet who, besides Ovid and Virgil, is the major exponent of Daedalus's architectural masterpiece in Latin literature.
Volume 33 in the Oklahoma Series in Classical Culture, this title provides primary sources on Clodia Metelli, the Roman woman who influenced Cicero, Catullus, and countless others.
CONTACT: FUN Technologies plc, James Lanthier, (416) 840-0806; Media Relations (UK), Alex Mackey, Catullus Consulting, +44 (0)207 736 2938; Media Relations (North America), Steve Acken, Environics Communications, (416) 969-2710, sacken@environicspr.
CONTACT: FUN Technologies, Tracey Irwin, Director of Communications, (416) 840-0806; Media Relations (UK), Alex Mackey, Catullus Consulting, +44 (0)207 736 2938; Media Relations (North America), Steve Acken, Environics Communications, (416) 969-2710, sacken@environicspr.
Like his master Ben Jonson, Herrick created an ideal of classical order from the Latin masters of the short poetic forms: Horace, Catullus, and others.
CATULLUS can click again in the Apprentice Classified Stakes (5.
Sullivan,(4) and Amy Richlin(5) who each review the literary defense from Catullus to Pliny the Younger and its humanist revival.
59, 341pp) by academician author of numerous pedagogical materials Marianthe Colakis is comprised of selections from Catullus, Cicero, Livy, Ovid, Propertius, Tibullus, and Vergil.
In his essay on two prose poems by James Wright ["Of Two Sublimities," APR, July/August 2014], Laurence Lieberman cites Catullus as the source for Wright's image of "the tall slender cypresses that a poet here once called candles of darkness.
And if they enjoy Caractacus' adventures, Rachel has also written Catullus the Caterpillar and Ariadne Armadillo to read next.