Catullus


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Catullus

(Caius Valerius Catullus) (kətŭl`əs), 84? B.C.–54? B.C., Roman poet, b. Verona. Of a well-to-do family, he went c.62 B.C. to Rome. He fell deeply in love, probably with Clodia, sister of Cicero's opponent Publius Clodius. She was suspected of murdering her husband. Catullus wrote to his beloved, addressed as Lesbia (to recall Sappho of Lesbos), a series of superb little poems that run from early passion and tenderness to the hatred and disillusionment that overwhelmed him after his mistress was faithless. Of the 116 extant poems attributed to him, three (18–20) are almost certainly spurious. They include, besides the Lesbia poems, poems to his young friend Juventius; epigrams, ranging from the genial to the obscenely derisive; elegies; a few long poems, notably "Attis" and a nuptial poem honoring Thetis and Peleus; and various short pieces. His satire is vigorous and flexible, his light poems joyful and full-bodied. He was influenced by the Alexandrians and drew much on the Greeks for form and meter, but his genius outran all models. Catullus is one of the greatest lyric poets of all time. Two of his most popular poems are the 10-line poem, touching and simple, which ends, "frater ave atque vale" [hail, brother, and farewell], and "On the Death of Lesbia's Sparrow."

Bibliography

See translations by R. Myers and R. J. Ormsby (1970), C. Martin (1990), and P. Green (2005); studies by A. L. Wheeler (1934, repr. 1964), T. Frank (1928, repr. 1965), K. Quinn (1959, 1970, and 1972), R. Jenkyns (1982), T. P. Wiseman (1985), J. Ferguson (1988), and C. Martin (1992).

Catullus

Gaius Valerius . ?84--?54 bc, Roman lyric poet, noted particularly for his love poems
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in a closer reading, it is revealed that Naude is oversimplifying the complex literary relationship between Catullus and Horace for his own purposes, in order to illustrate the chosen perspective of the poet to be either pro-state and order (as Horace is depicted to be) or anti-state and per implication pro chaos, as Catullus seems to be.
Quite a few of Wright's prose poems are steeped in his love of Catullus's writings, and therefore I mistakenly ascribed the phrase "candles of darkness" to Catullus.
In the same way, Catullus too, would like to satisfy his erotic passions through the act of masturbation.
O you chorus of indolent reviewers, Irresponsible, indolent reviewers, Look, I come to the test, a tiny poem All composed in a metre of Catullus, All in quantity, careful of my motion, Like the skater on ice that hardly bears him, Lest I fall unawares before the people, Waking laughter in indolent reviewers,.
In perhaps the most comprehensive essay on the topic to date, Skinner argued that the myth of a meretrix (aristocratic prostitute) with insatiable lust and homicidal ruthlessness resulted from Cicero's forensic oration (Pro Caelio) and the love poetry of Catullus.
Take Catullus 39, for example, where Catullus's rival, Egnatius, is flirting with Catullus's puella.
5) A possible early analogue, however, incorporating these lines and including a very similar progression of thought, appears in Poem 8 of the first-century BCE Roman poet Catullus.
For example, when Pomeroy imagines Regilla's wedding, she acknowledges the lack of information about such ceremonies in the early Empire, but reasonably supposes that conservative Romans would have preserved those of the past, for which there is evidence of a sort--from a poem by Catullus.
He had been reading the poems of Catullus and felt he had sunk to a
Cinna and his fellow poet Catullus began their careers in the age of Pompey, whom Caesar had defeated on his own path to power.
The present study will limit itself to translations of poetic works, and I will focus on the following: the two religious hymns, "Hymnus de Passione Domini" and "De beata virgine," the two epigrams, "Carmina V" by Catullus, and three episodes from Ovid's Metamorphoses ("La fabula de Acteon," "La historia de Piramo y Tisbe," and the "Canto de Polifemo").
While this historical town has been choked by tourism, if you visit in low season you'll probably gain more from not having to fight the crowds walking around the ramparts of the 13th century castle, the Rocca Scaligera, with its swan-filled moat, or visiting the Grotte di Catullo (caves of Catullus), a huge Roman villa on Sirmione's northern tip which is believed to have belonged to the poet Catullus.