Cave of Mammon

Cave of Mammon

abode of god of riches. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
See: Wealth
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sermon Parody and Discourses of the Flesh in Book II," originally published in Spenser Studies 7 (1987), examines several characters as preachers, including Mammon and Phaedria, and includes a persuasive reading of Guyon's much-discussed faint upon his emergence from the Cave of Mammon.
Elsewhere Dowling examines Milton's literary authorities and examines the effects of Milton's distortions, including his famous revision of the Cave of Mammon episode in The Faerie Queene: unlike most critics, Dowling argues that Milton's error that the Palmer accompanies Guyon is a deliberate (rather than unconscious) misstatement on Milton's part in order to encourage his discriminating reader to distinguish true Christian temperance from true philosophical temperance.
Other topics include infants and the battle for the future in The Faerie Queene, Milton's compressed memory in Areopagitica of Spenser's Cave of Mammon, art and objectivity in the House of Busirane, Spenser's "May" eclogue and charitable admonition, Henry Lok and holy disorder in devotional lyric, evidence from Thomas Middleton on Spenserianism and satire before and after the bishops' ban, and a mortgage agreement of Edmund Spenser's grandson Hugolin Spenser.