Cecco d'Ascoli


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Cecco d'Ascoli

(chĕk`kō däs`kōlē), 1269?–1327, Italian astrologer, mathematician, poet, and physician, whose real name was Francesco degli Stabili, b. Ascoli. A teacher of astrology at several institutions in Italy, he was professor of mathematics and astrology at the Univ. of Bologna (1322–24). He was denounced as heretical largely because, in defending astrology against Dante's attack on it in the Divine Comedy, Cecco himself had accused the great poet of heresy; he was burned at the stake. His chief work was L'acerba, an allegorical didactic poem of encyclopedic range.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dal Physiologus latino sino a L'Acerba di Cecco d'Ascoli, nel basso Medioevo gli esempi in cui si accenna alla condizione vedovile dell'uccello sono innumerevoli e percorrono le varie produzioni letterarie attraverso i secoli.
Weill-Parot pursues these problems in al-Kindi, Guillaume d'Auvergne, Albertus Magnus, Thomas Aquinas, Roger Bacon, and then more briefly in Matteo d'Aquasparta, John Peckham, Pierre d'Auvergne, Michael Scot, Cecco d'Ascoli, John of Eschenden, Leopoldus of Austria, Taddeo da Parma, John of Saxe, Andreas de Sommaria, Nicole Oresme, Heinrich von Langenstein, Arnaud de Villeneuve, Pietro d'Abano, Guy de Chauliac, and various other fourteenth-century physicians.
The monograph under review here was the first chapter of a 2005 Dottorato di Ricerca thesis at the Sorbonne, entitled Perspectives metaphysiques dans la poesie italienne duXIVe siecle: l'Acerba de Cecco d'Ascoli (11).
Cecco d'Ascoli (an astrologer and astronomical poet burned at the stake for heresy in Florence in 1327) wrote a commentary on Alcabizio around 1324 (Boffito).
25) Similarly, in his correspondence poem to Cecco d'Ascoli, Cecco, i' ti prego per virtu di quella (CXLVII), the quatrains present a request for advice based on his interlocutor's expertise (astrological rather than amorous), but exilic political material appears in the tercets.