cedar

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Related to Cedrus: Cedrus deodara

cedar,

common name for a number of trees, mostly coniferous evergreens. The true cedars belong to the small genus Cedrus of the family Pinaceae (pinepine,
common name for members of the Pinaceae, a family of resinous woody trees with needlelike, usually evergreen leaves. The Pinaceae reproduce by means of cones (see cone) rather than flowers and many have winged seeds, suitable for wind distribution.
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 family). All are native to the Old World from the Mediterranean to the Himalayas, although several are cultivated elsewhere as ornamentals, especially the cedar of Lebanon (C. libani), which appears in the Lebanese flag. This tree, native to Asia Minor and North Africa, is famous for the historic groves of the Lebanon Mts., frequently mentioned in the Bible. The wood used in building the Temple and the house of Solomon (1 Kings 5, 6, and 7) may, however, have been that of the deodar cedar (C. deodara), native to the Himalayas. It has fragrant wood, durable and fine grained, and is venerated by the Hindus, who call it Tree of God. The name cedar is used (particularly in North America, where no cedars are native) for other conifers, e.g., the juniperjuniper,
any tree or shrub of the genus Juniperus, aromatic evergreens of the family Cupressaceae (cypress family), widely distributed over the north temperate zone. Many are valuable as a source of lumber and oil. The small fleshy cones are berrylike in appearance.
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 (red cedar), arborvitaearborvitae
[Lat.,=tree of life], aromatic evergreen tree of the genus Thuja of the family Cupressaceae (cypress family), with scalelike leaves borne on flattened branchlets of a fanlike appearance and with very small cones.
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 (white cedar), and others of the family Cupressaceae (cypresscypress,
common name for members of the Cupressaceae, a widely distributed family of coniferous shrubs and trees, several yielding valuable timber. The major genera are Juniperus (juniper), Thuja (arborvitae), and Cupressus (the true cypresses).
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 family). Several tropical American trees of the genus Cedrela of the mahoganymahogany,
common name for the Meliaceae, a widely distributed family of chiefly tropical shrubs and trees, often having scented wood. The valuable hardwood called mahogany is obtained from many members of the family; in America and Europe it is imported for cabinetmaking and
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 family are also called cedars. True cedars are classified in the division PinophytaPinophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called gymnosperms. The gymnosperms, a group that includes the pine, have stems, roots and leaves, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Pinopsida, order Coniferales, family Pinaceae.

cedar

A highly aromatic, moderately high-density, fine-textured wood of a distinctive red color with white streaks; widely used for fence posts, shingles, and mothproof closet linings. See also: Wood
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cedar

cedar

Looks like juniper. (dry mealy blue-green berries almost all stone, little flesh. Juniper berries have 3-7 stones, whereas cedar has one large stone). Grows 10-20 feet high and wide. Bark is shaggy and soft. Chew cedar leaves to clean teeth. Cedar berries help diabetics cut down on insulin. (helps pancreas) Berries also used to expel worms, fight colds, coughs, rheumatism, yeast, fungus, anti-tumor activity. Leaf branches used for fungus, worms, lung problems like asthma and bronchitis, prostate urinary issues, herpes. Antiseptic expectorant. Indians used it in sweat lodges for arthritis and rheumatism. Do not take internally if pregnant. Contains podophyllotoxin, used for cancer. May be toxic in high amounts. Do not take cedar oil internally.

Cedar

 

(Cedrus), a genus of coniferous evergreen trees of the family Pinaceae. The trunk is 25–50 m high, with a dark gray, dehiscent, and scaly bark. The crown is spreading and pyramidal or umbrelled (on old trees). The evergreen leaves are acicular, trihedral or tetrahedral, stiff, and spiny; they range in color from dark green and blue-green to silver-gray. The leaves are in fascicles of 30–40 on short shoots (pulvini) or spirally arranged and single on long shoots. The cedar blossoms in the fall. The anther spikelets are individual and surrounded by groups of leaves; the pollen has sacs. The cones are individual, erect, barrel-shaped or ovid, and elongated (length, 5–10 cm; width, 4–6 cm); they mature and fall in the second or third year. The seed-bearing scales are imbricate, appressed, and shaped like broad kidneys. The seeds are resinous, 12–18 mm long, triangular, and winged; they are not edible. The cedar has a surface root system.

Cedars grow on mountains at altitudes of 1,300–3,600 m, forming cedar forests with fir, spruce, pine, oak, and four other species of trees. The Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica) is found in the Atlas Mountains of northwest Africa. The cedar of Lebanon (C. libani) grows in Lebanon and Syria and on the Cilician Taurus in Asia Minor. The Cyprian cedar (C. brevifolia) is found on Cyprus; the deodar (C. deodard) in the Western Himalayas. The wood is yellowish or reddish, fragrant, and resistant to fungus and insect damage.

Cedar trees are cultivated in parks. The blue and silver varieties are particularly valuable. In the USSR cedars, most frequently the Atlas and deodar, are cultivated as ornamentals in the Crimea, Caucasus, and southern Middle Asia. The Atlas is 40 m high and has a pyramidal crown of bluish green, grayish silver, or, less commonly, green needles. The needles measure less than 2.5 cm long. The deodar is 50 m high, with a pyramidal crown and light gray-green slender needles. The needles are 2.5–5.0 cm long.

Several species of pine (for example, the nut pines) and the incense cedars of the coniferous genus Libocedrus of the family Cupressaceae are incorrectly called cedars. Six species of incense cedar are found in New Zealand, New Caledonia, and southern Chile; two species, L. chilensis and L. decurens, are cultivated in the Crimea and Transcaucasia. Several other species of trees are sometimes called cedar. An American juniper, Juniperus virginiana, is also known as the eastern-red cedar. The American arborvitae (Thuja occidentalis) is sometimes called the white cedar.

REFERENCES

Derev’ia i kustarniki SSSR, vol. 1. Moscow-Leningrad, 1949.
Walter, H. Die Vegetation der Erde in öko-physiologischen Betrachtung, vol. 2. Jena, 1968.

cedar

[′sē·dər]
(botany)
The common name for a large number of evergreen trees in the order Pinales having fragrant, durable wood.

cedar

A durable softwood generally noted for decay resistance; includes western red cedar, incense cedar, eastern red cedar.

cedar

symbol of everlasting life. [Western Folklore: Jobes, 301]

cedar

1. any Old World coniferous tree of the genus Cedrus, having spreading branches, needle-like evergreen leaves, and erect barrel-shaped cones: family Pinaceae See also cedar of Lebanon deodar
2. any of various other conifers, such as the red cedars and white cedars
3. the wood of any of these trees
4. any of certain other plants, such as the Spanish cedar

Cedar

A superset of Mesa, from Xerox PARC, adding garbage collection, dynamic types and a universal pointer type (REF ANY). Cedar is a large complex language designed for custom Xerox hardware and the Cedar operating system/environment. Data types are atoms, lists, ropes ("industrial strength" strings), conditions. Multi-processing features include threads, monitors, signals and catch phrases. It was used to develop the Cedar integrated programming environment.

["A Description of the Cedar Language", Butler Lampson, Xerox PARC, CSL-83-15 (Dec 1983)].

["The Structure of Cedar", D. Swinehart et al, SIGPLAN Notices 20(7):230-244 (July 1985)].
References in periodicals archive ?
Corpus Anima: Reflections from the Unity of Body and Soul, by Cedrus Monte, PhD available from chironpublications.
Cedrus Invest Bank is a Beirut-based wealth management provider and the majority shareholder in Cedrus Bank, with an 85 percent stake.
Fadi Assali, co-founder and chairman of Cedrus Bank, said, 'Raising our equity by more than four times reflects our shareholders' trust in the Lebanese economy .
Based on the collaboration agreement between PT Antam and Cedrus, PT Antam will provide Cedrus with access to its minerals, including nickel ore, ferronickel, gold, silver, bauxite and coal, as well as services related to the logistics, operations, infrastructure, and equipment needed to successfully run a mining operation.
No matter how Weston fares on Cedrus Libani he has a good chance on Just Dave (5.
Tree species recorded as testing positive for Cryptococcus gattii Location Species (common name) Native and exported tree ranges Argentina Acacia visco (arca), Cedrus Australia, Africa, Asia, deodara * (deodar cedar), Britain, Canada, Central Cupressus sempervirens * America, England, Europe, (Mediterranean cypress), Japan, South America, Eucalyptus microcorys United States (tallowwood), Tipuana tipu (rosewood), Ulmus campestris (English elm) Australia Angophora costata (smooth Australia, Africa, Asia, bark apple), E.
Also, Gravely (1935) reported a male of this genus in a retreat built in deodar Cedrus deodara humus, which he mentions as unusual since these spider retreats were generally found on tree trunks.
Table 4: Ayurvedic Herbs for Further Development Botanical Name Ayurvedic Name Inside Treatment Adhatoda zeylanica Vasa Bronchial constriction Azardiracta indica Neem Bacterial infection Boerhaavia diffusa Punarnava Inflammation Butea monosperma Palasha Intestinal worms Cedrus deodara Devdaar Muscle spasm Celatrus paniculatus Jyotishmati Memory problems Emblica officinalis Amla Astringent Ocimum sanctum Tulsi Antibacterial Picrorhiza kurroa Kutuka Liver toxicity Pterocarpus mars.
Similarly Centratherum anthelminticum, Cedrus deodara, Sphaeranthus indicus and Ricinus communis were claimed to possess activity against S.
It will include some 54 plants and trees, such as Cedrus Libani to Aloe Vera, from Zingiber Officinalis to Thymus vulgaris.
In a statement, Northamptonshire Police said: "Acting on information Police and the ambulance service went to a house in Cedrus Court, Kingsthorpe, Northampton, where they had to force an entry.