ceiling

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ceiling

1. the inner upper surface of a room
2. 
a. an upper limit, such as one set by regulation on prices or wages
b. (as modifier): ceiling prices
3. the upper altitude to which an aircraft can climb measured under specified conditions
4. Meteorol the highest level in the atmosphere from which the earth's surface is visible at a particular time, usually the base of a cloud layer
5. a wooden or metal surface fixed to the interior frames of a vessel for rigidity

Ceiling

The undercovering of a roof or floor; generally concealing the structural members from the room or roof above, or the underside surface. It may have a flat or curved surface, and be self-supporting, suspended from the floor above, or supported from hidden or exposed beams.

exposed ceiling

A ceiling in which all the structural and mechanical systems are left exposed, either in their natural state or painted.

false ceiling

A ceiling suspended or hung from the floor above, which hides the underneath structure and provides a space for the mechanical systems, wires and ducts.

luminous ceiling

A system in which the whole ceiling is translucent with lamps that are installed above and suspended from a structural ceiling.

suspended ceiling

A nonstructural ceiling suspended below the overhead structural slab or from the structural elements of a building and not bearing on the walls.

Ceiling

 

the overhead inside lining of a room; a group of structural elements forming a secondary covering that is suspended from the roof.

Ceilings’ may be smooth or have projecting ribs, coffers, or other sculptured details. Smooth ceilings may or may not cover beams. They are made from plaster, boards, or sheeting materials. Suspended ceilings are used mainly to provide better sound absorption and to increase the sound insulation of the roof. They also conceal ventilation ducts, heating pipes, and electrical wiring. Such ceilings are used as decorative elements in interior design.

In modern mass-scale housing construction, the smoothing of seams and painting constitute the principal method for finishing ceilings made of slabs and panels. In public buildings, ceilings are more and more often being faced with slab materials having good acoustic properties. Such materials include perforated aluminum panels and porous plasterboard with a sound-absorbent fiberglass layer. In a room whose ceiling serves as an element of interior design, more decorative painted or sculptured finishes are used.

Z. A. KAZBEK-KAZIEV

ceiling

[′sē·liŋ]
(building construction)
The covering made of plaster, boards, or other material that constitutes the overhead surface in a room.
(mathematics)
The smallest integer that is equal to or greater than a given real number a ; symbolized ⌈ a ⌉.
(meteorology)
In the United States, the height ascribed to the lowest layer of clouds or of obscuring phenomena when it is reported as broken, overcast, or obscuration and not classified as thin or partial.

ceiling

The overhead surface of a room, usually a covering or decorative treatment used to conceal the floor above or the roof.

ceiling

i. The height above the ground or water of the base of the lowest layer of cloud below 6000 m (20,000 ft), covering more than half the sky (ICAO). The term also refers to the vertical visibility in a surface-based layer that completely obscures the whole sky, whichever is lesser.
ii. The highest pressure altitude that can be reached by an aircraft, excepting a zoom climb. At this altitude, the aircraft rate of climb is zero. Also called absolute ceiling.
References in classic literature ?
Feeble gleams of encrimsoned light made their way through the trellised panes, and served to render sufficiently distinct the more prominent objects around; the eye, however, struggled in vain to reach the remoter angles of the chamber, or the recesses of the vaulted and fretted ceiling.
They lay in an attic beneath a wavy whitewashed ceiling, and, because it rained, a wood fire was made in an iron basket on a brick hearth, and they fell asleep to the chirping of mice and the whimper of flames.
If they are coming, Sir Harry will let them move in before the twenty-ninth, and he will cross out the clause about whitewashing the ceilings, because it made them nervous, and put in the fair wear and tear one.
A winding drive led up between iron stags and blue glass balls embedded in mounds of geraniums to a front door of highly-varnished walnut under a striped verandah-roof; and behind it ran a narrow hall with a black and yellow star-patterned parquet floor, upon which opened four small square rooms with heavy flock-papers under ceilings on which an Italian house-painter had lavished all the divinities of Olympus.
But its roomy staircases, passages, and antechambers still remain; and even its painted ceilings, where Allegory, in Roman helmet and celestial linen, sprawls among balustrades and pillars, flowers, clouds, and big-legged boys, and makes the head ache--as would seem to be Allegory's object always, more or less.
It is vast, and has colonnades of noble pillars, and a great organ, and the customary pomp of gilded moldings, pictures, frescoed ceilings, and so forth.
The voices ascended like vapors through the thick ceilings and the massive walls, and rose in accusations against the author of this noise, as doubtless their sighs and tears accused, in whispered tones, the author of their captivity.
The sounds of crackling and the din of falling walls and ceilings, the whistle and hiss of the flames, the excited shouts of the people, and the sight of the swaying smoke, now gathering into thick black clouds and now soaring up with glittering sparks, with here and there dense sheaves of flame (now red and now like golden fish scales creeping along the walls), and the heat and smoke and rapidity of motion, produced on Pierre the usual animating effects of a conflagration.
The roofs of the buildings varied in height but as the ceilings were all low he found that he could easily travel along the roof tops and this he did for some little distance, until he suddenly discovered just ahead of him several figures reclining upon the roof of a near-by building.
The capitals of many of the columns supporting the ceilings of the corridors and chambers through which they passed were wrought into formal likenesses of jetan pieces--everywhere there seemed a suggestion of the game.
The Blind Girl never knew that ceilings were discoloured, walls blotched and bare of plaster here and there, high crevices unstopped and widening every day, beams mouldering and tending downward.
Nothing was spared but the solid floors and the finely-carved ceilings.