complete blood count

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Related to Cell count: hemocytometer, White blood cell count

complete blood count

[kəm′plēt ′bləd ‚kau̇nt]
(pathology)
Differential and absolute determinations of the numbers of each type of blood cell in a sample and, by extrapolation, in the general circulation.
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In some cases, treatment is interrupted according to a scheduled time frame, while other studies have used CD4 T cell counts or viral load as indicators of when to stop or re-initiate therapy.
High somatic cell counts attract penalties from milk buyers, so for many dairy farmers there is an immediate financial incentive to maintain herd levels below a given thresh- old,' said David Wilde of animal-feed experts Alltech.
Expenditures totaled $13,885 for individuals at the earliest stage of disease but rose steadily across declining strata of CD4 cell counts, reaching $36,532 for those with the most advanced disease.
A recent study in the Caribbean population confirmed that there was a progressive increase in CD4+ T cell count throughout the day.
3] in HIV-positive adults, data from two studies presented at the conference indicate that waiting until CD4 cell counts decline to that level significantly increases morbidity and mortality, compared with starting treatment when CD4 counts are between 350 and 500 cells/[m[m.
This series of articles will address the performance of cell counts and differential cell counts on the three most common categories of body fluids: cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), serous or body cavity fluids (pleural, pericardial, peritoneal), and synovial or joint fluids.
Responses occurred in 55 percent of those with myeloid blast crisis, with four of those patients having their white blood cell counts returned to normal.
Producers can't sell milk with cell counts that exceed the legal limit.
Two studies involved people with a CD4 cell count below 200 cells/m[m.
There are no specific guidelines for when and how to report cell counts and differentials in CSF, with very little literature on the subject beyond suggesting that a cell count and differential are important.