cell-mediated immunity

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cell-mediated immunity

[¦sel ¦mē·dē‚ād·əd i′myü·nəd·ē]
(immunology)
Immune responses produced by the activities of T cells rather than by immunoglobulins.
References in periodicals archive ?
More importantly, we're hopeful that our evaluation of both antibody response and T cell response to Borrelia infection will provide new insights into the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of Lyme disease, which is a potentially serious and increasingly common infection.
First author Dr Jun Wei, an instructor in the Department of Neurosurgery said that glioblastoma stem cells suppress T cell response in three different ways: By producing immunosuppressive cytokines that prevent the responses of T cells.
Since this factor is a multiplier to all load cell response readings R acquired for subsequent force calibration measurements, the standard uncertainty in R that is associated with the comparison calibrations of the multimeters with the simulator is
has been awarded a $357,000 NIH Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) award that supports pre-clinical testing of a novel HIV DNA vaccine incorporating Antigen Express proprietary platform technology for boosting antigen-specific T-helper cell responses.
Studies in rhesus monkeys have shown that significant and persistent virus-specific T cell responses can be elicited with vaccines incorporating viral genetic sequences and that these responses are primarily mediated by CD8 T cells.
Genocea Biosciences is a vaccine discovery and development company targeting major infectious diseases with high unmet medical needs, in which T cell responses help confer protection.
Contract notice: Microbiological analysis of samples in indoor environments in connection with the tasks of the regional cell response indoor pollution.
Relying on data drawn from a prospective cohort study, French investigators report that the CD4 T cell response after 6 months of HAART predicts clinical outcome at 2 years regardless of virologic response.
As expected, all three non-responders at month 4 still did not show a T cell response at month 9.
However, the researchers found that restoring the gene for that protein alone wasn't enough to strengthen T cell response against TB.
A third study showed a strong CD4 T cell response during PHI, which was conserved in patients who received treatment, but was "strongly" reduced in untreated patients (Abstract 583).
A rapid and dose-dependent T cell response (defined in antigen-specific IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays) was also observed and remained significantly elevated for at least four months.