Celsus


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Celsus

(sĕl`səs), 2d cent., Roman philosopher, an aggressive antagonist of Christianity. His works have been lost, but the substance of his True Discourse is given by Origen in his Against Celsus, ed. and tr. by Henry Chadwick (1953, repr. 1965).
References in classic literature ?
Celsus could never have spoken it as a physician, had he not been a wise man withal, when he giveth it for one of the great precepts of health and lasting, that a man do vary, and interchange contraries, but with an inclination to the more benign extreme: use fasting and full eating, but rather full eating; watching and sleep, but rather sleep; sitting and exercise, but rather exercise; and the like.
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Another attraction is the Library of Celsus in the city of Ephesus.
Following stakeholder approval received at a general meeting of the shareholders of Celsus held on September 16, 2015, Celsus Therapeutics and Volution Immuno Pharmaceuticals SA announced that,
More than 150 years of excavation have revealed marvellous structures dating back nearly 2,000 years, including the Library of Celsus, mighty temples and a huge theatre, as well as extraordinary homes and public bathrooms.
As I read about the Library of Celsus and the Virgins of Hestia, I wondered whether the owners of Ephesus should have paid the same attention to the authenticity of the cooking.
I stumble down an uneven and pillar-lined hill in the ruined city, heading towards the skeletal remains of the once grand Roman Celsus library.
Celsus was confident in claiming that Christian superstition was due in no small part to the intellectual and moral failings that resulted from not having received a proper education.
Contrary to what we might expect, early Christian theologians like Origen and Justin Martyr agreed with the second-century Greek philosopher Celsus that certain pagan myths (like Zeus' fathering of Perseus or Apollo's of Plato) strikingly resembled Matthew's and Luke's account of the virgin birth.
Earlier critics such as Celsus, Porphyry, and Julian had made good use of this association to portray Christianity as little more than a bastardized form of Judaism, which was in turn, as they saw it, the religion of a barbarian people at the fringes of the Empire.