Celtiberians


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Celtiberians

 

tribes in northeastern Spain of mixed Iberian and Celtic stock; Celts settled in the Iberian Peninsula between the fifth and third centuries B.C. The Arevaci were the main tribe. The area inhabited by the tribes was called Celtiberia. In 195 B.C. part of Celtiberia was conquered by the Romans, and by 72 B.C. the entire region had become part of the Roman province of Hispania Citerior. The subjugated Celtiberians waged a protracted struggle against the Roman conquerors, staging uprisings in 195–193, 181–179, 153–151, 143–133, and 80–72 (the Sertorius rebellion).

References in periodicals archive ?
ABSTRACT: Quintus Sertorius was a leading role during the time of the falling of Roman Republic, and his character is closely related to Spain, where he raised a personal domain with a lot of supporters in a big number of celtiberian tribes.
While these Celtiberians could have been returned north from a campaign far to the south, they could just as easily have been campaigning against Lusitanian tribes on the border of Celtiberian lands much closer to their original homes.
For between two and three years the Cimbri must have devastated the province of Hispania Citerior and fought against the Celtiberians who finally forced their retreat from Iberia.
Perhaps the Romans reneged on promises to the Celtiberians or the Celtiberians having seen off the Cimbri, who had previously delivered severe blows to Roman prestige, were tempted into seeking greater freedom.
Neither the Romans nor the Numantines' fellow Celtiberians act upon the same values.
Based on the collective suicide of the Celtiberian city while under siege by the Romans in 133 B.
KEY WORDS: Iberian Peninsula -- ancient geography -- Pyrenees -- celtiberians.
Birth and early career unknown; as praetor in Macedonia, he suppressed the revolt of Andriscus, pretender to the Macedonian throne, and made the country into a Roman province (149-148); attacked the Achaean League to avenge an insult to a Roman envoy at Corinth (Korinthos) (146); after a successful campaign, he returned to Rome where he was granted a triumph and awarded the honorific "Macedonicus" for his subjugation of Macedonia; elected consul (143), he subdued the Celtiberians in northern Spain, except for the Numantines and the Termantines (143-142); politically moderate, he opposed Tiberius Sempronius Grachus, the controversial plebeian tribune (133); in concert with fellow censor, Q.
The historic identity of the people around the Irish sea is open to question, after decades of revisionist thought that the "Celts" did not exist, recent research has shown that the Gauls, Celtiberians and other speakers of the "Celtic" languages, did call themselves "Keltoi", which is taken to mean "descendants of the Hidden One".
In a recent article I have argued that Iberia, the source of much of Rome's silver in this period, suffered a catastrophe because of the invasion of the Cimbri in 105/4 and a widespread uprising against Roman rule led by the Celtiberians, and that peaceful conditions were only gradually restored, perhaps not before the end of the Social War.