Celtiberians


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Celtiberians

 

tribes in northeastern Spain of mixed Iberian and Celtic stock; Celts settled in the Iberian Peninsula between the fifth and third centuries B.C. The Arevaci were the main tribe. The area inhabited by the tribes was called Celtiberia. In 195 B.C. part of Celtiberia was conquered by the Romans, and by 72 B.C. the entire region had become part of the Roman province of Hispania Citerior. The subjugated Celtiberians waged a protracted struggle against the Roman conquerors, staging uprisings in 195–193, 181–179, 153–151, 143–133, and 80–72 (the Sertorius rebellion).

References in periodicals archive ?
While these Celtiberians could have been returned north from a campaign far to the south, they could just as easily have been campaigning against Lusitanian tribes on the border of Celtiberian lands much closer to their original homes.
For between two and three years the Cimbri must have devastated the province of Hispania Citerior and fought against the Celtiberians who finally forced their retreat from Iberia.
Perhaps the Romans reneged on promises to the Celtiberians or the Celtiberians having seen off the Cimbri, who had previously delivered severe blows to Roman prestige, were tempted into seeking greater freedom.
Neither the Romans nor the Numantines' fellow Celtiberians act upon the same values.
Based on the collective suicide of the Celtiberian city while under siege by the Romans in 133 B.
In this work he proposed a new myth to explain the origins of the Spanish character, calling on a mixture of Iberians and Celts: the Celtiberians (Lafuente 1850).
The merging of both peoples resulted in the Celtiberians (Gongora 1868).