Cementation


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Related to Cementation: Cementation process

cementation

[‚sē‚men′tā·shən]
(chemistry)
The setting of a plastic material.
(engineering)
Plugging a cavity or drill hole with cement. Also known as dental work.
Consolidation of loose sediments or sand by injection of a chemical agent or binder.
(geology)
The precipitation of a binding material around minerals or grains in rocks.
(metallurgy)
High-temperature impregnation of a metal surface with another material.
Conversion of wrought iron into steel by packing layers of bars in charcoal sealed with clay and heating to 1000°C for 7-10 days.

Cementation

 

in construction, the consolidation of soils, rocks, and stone or concrete masonry by injecting a cement solution or suspension into voids, cracks, or pores. The process is used to strengthen the beddings of structures; to provide seepage barriers; and to waterproof rocks in tunnels, mine shafts, and stone and concrete masonry, as well as to reduce the porosity of such masonry.


Cementation

 

in nonferrous metallurgy, a hydrometallurgical process based on the displacement of the more electropositive metals from solutions of their compounds by less electropositive metals in the solid state. For example, the normal electrode potential of copper is +0.344 volts, and that of zinc is –0.762 volts; the difference between the potentials makes it possible to obtain the reaction Cu2+solution + Znmetal → Zn2+solution + Cumetal. The greater the difference in potentials, the lower the content of precipitated metal that will remain in the solution. Cementation is extensively used to remove impurities from solutions and to recover metals from solutions. The process can also be used to precipitate metals from molten slags.

REFERENCES

Plaksin, I. N., and D. M. Iukhtanov. Gidrometallurgiia. Moscow, 1949.
Maslenitskii, I. N., and L. V. Chugaev. Metallurgiia blagorodnykh melallov. Moscow, 1972.
Naboichenko, S. S., and V. I. Smirnov. Gidrometallurgiia medi. Moscow, 1974.

cementation

The setting of a cement.
References in periodicals archive ?
She is an avid curler, a traveling enthusiast, the vice-president of finance at Cementation Canada and a director of Cementation and its companies in the United States and Mexico.
The relation between the displacement of clastic grains and carbonate cementation is well evident in the concretionary-cemented rocks (Fig.
While other mining service companies have staggered through the global industry downturn, Slack said Cementation has remained quite active, especially in its US: work.
Cementation occurs as lateral patches or 2 m thick lenses in the topmost part of the sediment complex, mainly between the two uppermost cobble-pebble layers (Fig.
A hybrid method of cementation is recommended; cemented acetabular components have been shown to have higher failure rates and are not recommended for use.
Nowadays, glass ionomer cements are more widely accepted for SM band cementation [Rajab, 2002; Moore and Kennedy, 2006; Fathian et al.
His firm, Cementation Foundations (Skanska), was also ordered to pay pounds 30,447 costs after admitting failing to ensure the safety of employees.
In September last year 266 litres of hazardous, dissolved spent fuel spilled on to a floor at Dounreay's cementation plant.
She also admitted she knew her son was in the pay of the construction firm Cementation, but decided to keep his financial interest secret.
Removal of arsenic from drinking water by precipitation, adsorption or cementation.
If this cementation steel furnace had not been built it is almost certain that Darby would not have created his blast furnace here and our history could be completely different.
For almost three months experts from Cementation Skanska have been pumping tonnes of water away at the rate of 30 litres a second.