Satyricon

(redirected from Cena trimalchionis)

Satyricon

tales of vice and luxury in imperial Rome. [Rom. Lit.: Satyricon]

Satyricon

novel by Petronius depicting social excesses in imperial Rome. [Rom. Lit.: Magill II, 938]
References in periodicals archive ?
The modern reader of the Cena Trimalchionis, seeing the episode grouped under the larger title Satyrica, could hardly be blamed for assuming a priori that Petronius had written a satirical work.
The language of the freedmen in Petronius' Cena Trimalchionis.
Some elucidations of Petronius' Cena Trimalchionis.
Students and scholars who are interested in the Cena Trimalchionis may also benefit from exposing themselves to methodologies and research techniques employed in archaeology and art history.
Unless I am mistaken, Encolpius only displays this obsessive desire to assimilate in the Cena Trimalchionis, and it would be interesting to connect this obsession with the character of the host, who, as a freed slave, is so concerned with the social process of gaining acceptance from a non-freedman environment.
Its longest surviving section, the cena Trimalchionis 'Trimalchio's feast,' lampoons a rich and oafish freedman's ostentatious banquet (roast sow stuffed with sausages being just one of innumerable items on the menu) in a masterful exercise in repeatedly arousing readers' disgust, only to pull us back from the brink of actually vomiting.
After a brief discussion of Quartilla's Priapean vigil, the discussion turns to the Cena Trimalchionis, the most celebrated episode in Petrionius's narrative.
The inverted and comic world of the Cena Trimalchionis derives much of its humor from the guests' laughter at Trimalchio's lavish displays of food and money.
The Cena Trimalchionis and Egalia's Daughters both depict comic situations in which non-privileged members of society imitate the clothing and behaviors associated with social privilege and prestige.
Of course we must keep perspective: the Cena Trimalchionis makes up about one third of what survives of the Satyricon, and what survives of the Satyricon is barely an eighth of the presumed total 24 books.
Petronii Artbitri Cena Trimalchionis, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
38-51) looks into one of the best known passages from the Satyrica and the most extended of all as the text stands at the moment, the Cena Trimalchionis, and expands on what Schmeling has already mentioned in the previous essay as the models of the Cena, namely Plato's Symposium and Horace's Cena Nasidieni in Sat.