Central Inhibition


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Central Inhibition

 

an active nervous process arising in the central nervous system and leading to the suppression or prevention of excitation. A distinction is made between postsynaptic inhibition, which involves the action of a specific mediator on the postsynaptic membrane of a neuron, and presynaptic inhibition, which is based on the depolarization of a presynaptic nerve ending at the point of contact with another axonal nerve ending. All types of inhibition occurring in conditioned reflex activity are regarded as forms of central inhibition.

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In addition, central inhibition of sexual response in both men and women will be reviewed.
While no single set of data or hypothesis explains all involuntary contractions or occurrences of urgency/frequency, four concepts seem to be valid: 1) patients with OAB have faulty central inhibition, which leads to enhancement of excitatory neurotransmission in the micturition reflex pathway (neurogenic); 2) there is partial denervation of smooth muscle, which leads to co-ordinated myogenic contractions and increased bladder pressure (myogenic); 3) there is a "leaking" of acetylcholine from parasympathetic nerves during filling/storage, which leads to afferent activation (neurogenic-myogenic); and 4) abnormal signals originating in the urothelium are influenced by generation and release of local mediators (e.

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