Cerambycidae


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Related to Cerambycidae: Longhorn beetle

Cerambycidae

[se·rəm′bī·sə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The longhorn beetles, a family of coleopteran insects in the superfamily Chrysomeloidea.

Cerambycidae

 

a family of insects of the order Coleoptera. The body is oblong and measures 3-180 mm long. The antennae are often quite long, and the jaws are well developed. The body coverings are hard and diversely colored (often speckled). The larvae are fleshy, with a very large prothorax and special bulges—“motor callosities”—on the abdominal segments. The legs of most are not developed. The larvae live in wood (on which they also feed), occasionally in the stems of herbaceous plants, and less often in the soil (where they feed on roots). The development of the larvae usually lasts about a year, sometimes longer.

There are about 20,000 species distributed throughout the world, the most numerous being in the tropics. About 800 species are found in the USSR, of which the largest is the Callipogon relictus, which may measure up to 10 cm long. Many cerambycids are wood and lumber pests. In coniferous forests representatives of the genus Monochamus inflict severe damage. Oak trees are damaged by the Cerambyx cerdo. The Hylotrupes bajulus destroys wooden structures and telegraph poles in the forested steppe and steppe regions. Pests of structures and wooden articles are destroyed by treating the infested wood; preventive measures include impregnating the wood with beetle repellants or long-acting insecticides. In forests, control reduces mainly to destroying the infested trees and to the timely removal from the forest of dead trees, windfalls, freshly sawed lumber, and deadwood.

N. N. PLAVIL’sHCHIKOV

References in periodicals archive ?
Catalogue on the Neotropical Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) with known host plant.
The members of each beetle guild are usually not closely related species but representatives of different tribes of Cerambycidae.
It appears that the colonization patterns found within the Cerambycidae (at least on the Leguminosae) resembles the colonization patterns that can be stated for most organisms associated with a particular host plant (or group of host plants).
a] Araneae 19 Tetragnathidae 2 Anyphaenidae 1 Odonata 21 Anisoptera 4 Zygoptera 4 Blattodea Blatellidae Blatella vaga Hebard 2 Hemiptera Heteroptera 2 Corixidae 4 Miridae 3 Cicadellidae 43 Derbidae 1 Coleoptera 12 Scarabaeidae 1 Coccinellidae 4 Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant) 1 Cerambycidae Aneffomorpha sp.
Cerambycidae associated with hybrid Eucalyptus urograndis and native vegetation in Carbonita, Minas Gerais State, Brazil.
Additions and corrections to the new Catalogue of Palaearctic Cerambycidae.
Two newly recorded species of Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) from China.
There are approximately 30,000 described species of the Cerambycidae (Monne et al.
Increasing damage by Cerambycidae is being reported in forest systems.
The diversity of Cerambycidae can differ between regions, as C.
The correlation with environmental variables is related to abundance of adult Cerambycidae, because the quantity of rainfall does not limit local species richness.
Research has proven that the TS sensillum has many functions in the Cerambycidae and is an important organelle for insects to perceive sex pheromones (Wang et al.