ceramic

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ceramic

1. a hard brittle material made by firing clay and similar substances
2. an object made from such a material
3. of, relating to, or made from a ceramic
4. of or relating to ceramics

Ceramic

Burnt clayware, consisting of a mixture of sand and clay, shaped, dried and finally fired in a kiln. Main types include terra-cotta, used mainly for unglazed air bricks, chimney pots and floor tiles; fire clay, used for flue linings since it has a fire resistance; vitreous china, used for plumbing fixtures and sanitary appliances.

ceramic

[sə′ram·ik]
(materials)
Inorganic, nonmetallic materials processed or used at high temperature, generally including oxides, nitrides, borides, carbides, silicides, and sulfides. Intermetallic compounds such as aluminides and beryllides are also considered ceramics, as are phosphides, antimonides, and arsenides.
Consisting of such a product.

ceramic

Any of a class of products, made of clay or a similar material, which are subjected to a high temperature during manufacture or use, as porcelain, stoneware, or terra-cotta; typically a ceramic is a metallic oxide, boride, carbide, or nitride, or a mixture or compound of such materials; hard, brittle, and an electrical insulator.
References in periodicals archive ?
No one had ever suspected that such ceramic compounds could become superconductors or, indeed, that any material could be a superconductor at a temperature higher than about 20 kelvins, the highest temperature at which certain metals can behave as superconductors.
Since the 1987 announcement of ceramic compounds that superconduct at liquid-nitrogen temperatures, visions of cheaper, cleaner energy production, magnetically levitated trains and exotic technologies have filled scientists' imaginations.
Rice recently learned that the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Transactions on Applied Superconductivity has accepted a paper she co-authored, titled "Moldable Ceramic Compounds for High Field Magnet Applications" for publication.
Although the search for new superconductors has focused largely on ceramic compounds containing copper and oxygen, one of the earliest ceramic superconductors, discovered in 1975, consisted of barium, lead, bismuth and oxygen.
These new ceramic compounds have the added potential advantage of possibly being used to bind phosphate directly in a dialysis device during kidney dialysis.
Specialists in the field had generallyexpected that these materials, which are ceramic compounds of copper oxide with rare-earth elements, would have the capacity to stand very high currents.
We believe our new ceramic compounds have the added potential advantage of possibly being used to bind phosphate directly in a dialysis device during kidney dialysis.