ceramic

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ceramic

1. a hard brittle material made by firing clay and similar substances
2. an object made from such a material
3. of, relating to, or made from a ceramic
4. of or relating to ceramics

Ceramic

Burnt clayware, consisting of a mixture of sand and clay, shaped, dried and finally fired in a kiln. Main types include terra-cotta, used mainly for unglazed air bricks, chimney pots and floor tiles; fire clay, used for flue linings since it has a fire resistance; vitreous china, used for plumbing fixtures and sanitary appliances.

ceramic

[sə′ram·ik]
(materials)
Inorganic, nonmetallic materials processed or used at high temperature, generally including oxides, nitrides, borides, carbides, silicides, and sulfides. Intermetallic compounds such as aluminides and beryllides are also considered ceramics, as are phosphides, antimonides, and arsenides.
Consisting of such a product.

ceramic

Any of a class of products, made of clay or a similar material, which are subjected to a high temperature during manufacture or use, as porcelain, stoneware, or terra-cotta; typically a ceramic is a metallic oxide, boride, carbide, or nitride, or a mixture or compound of such materials; hard, brittle, and an electrical insulator.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ceramic materials, being monolithic in structure, do not have this characteristic weakness.
has begun producing the PerformancePlus Series of clutch/brakes, which have armatures and other friction surfaces of ceramic material.
The object is a device for measuring the fundamental functional characteristics and parameters of the piezoelectric ceramic materials with ferroelectric and pyroelectric properties of these measurements with the potential to expand the area multiferoickE'ch materials.
Recent experiments reveal that an unusual ceramic material, titanium silicon carbide ([Ti.
Less well known is the capability of some ceramic materials to become soft and pliable when heated.
and the Investment Casting Institute reported on a study designed to measure the dielectric properties (microwave properties) of the common ceramic materials used in investment casting molds 91-166).
com/research/a06c61/the_semiconductor) has announced the addition of the "The Semiconductor Industry OEM Market for Ceramic Materials 2011" report to their offering.
The brochure outlines CeramTec's expertise in ceramic materials and product development for current and emerging markets.
Some of the ceramic materials proved to have critical temperatures higher than 160 K, fanning hopes that room-temperature superconductivity was within reach.
New Products offer potential for cost of ownership, and chemical and thermal stability advantages over alternative ceramic materials
Ceramic materials that carry electricity at low temperatures with no resistance are showing up in prototype cables, transformers, and other devices.
Moreover, the trend will remain upgrading, especially in electronic ceramics and military structure ceramic materials.