Ceratophyllum


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Ceratophyllum

 

(hornwort), a genus of plants of the family Ceratophyllaceae. The perennial underwater herbs have thin, branching stems reaching 1–1.5 m in length. The perianth of the staminate flowers is whitish and generally consists of 12 sections; the perianth of the pistillate flowers is greenish and has nine or ten sections. There are about ten species of Ceratophyllum, distributed throughout the world. The USSR has six to eight species, including C. demersum and C. submersum, which grow in stagnant and slowly moving waters. Hornworts serve as food for fish and waterfowl.

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Likewise, Ceratophyllum demersum is abundant on swamp sites but becomes progressively rarer on drier sites.
Having stated this, it is important to note that Silver Lake contains some floristically significant taxa, such as Myriophyllum verticillatum and Ceratophyllum echinatum.
Unit IX of Division B marks the disappearance of conifer and other remains of terrestrial origin and the appearance of Ceratophyllum demersum (hornwort) leaves.
in Vallisneria (Arisz, 1960), Elodea, and Ceratophyllum (Chandra et al.
Habitat: Lakes, in water up to 7 m (Voss 1972), in clear waters, often associated with Ceratophyllum demersum, Najas flexilis, Potamogeton amplifolius, P.
Here the river bed is usually covered by submerged macrophytes, including Ceratophyllum demersum, Myriophyllum sp.
Lake sediments were usually highly decomposed (sapric) but contained subfossils of submergent and emergent aquatic macrophytes such as Ceratophyllum demersum, Najas flexilis, Potamogeton spp.
For instance, Ceratophyllum plants protect themselves from herbivores by unidentified repellent substances (Bronmark, 1985), and aquatic plants of several genera--Lyonia, for example--produce effective hemolytic piscicides (Bhatt & Farswan, 1992).
Submergent macrophytes include Ceratophyllum demersum and Potamogeton spp.
Mercury has been shown to be released from sediments and accumulated by plants like Ceratophyllum demersum and Anodonta grandis (Hammer et al.