angiography

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angiography

[‚an·jē′äg·rə·fē]
(medicine)
Roentgenographic visualization of blood vessels following injection of a radiopaque material.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pituitary insufficiency and regresion of acromegaly caused by pituitary apoplexy following cerebral angiography.
It is clear from multiple reports that the primary preoperative concern is formation of a traumatic pseudoaneurysm, which prompts both preoperative and follow-up cerebral angiography.
Even after adjusting for patient demographics, comorbidity, ability to pay, and provider characteristics, African American patients were significantly less likely to receive noninvasive cerebrovascular testing, cerebral angiography, or carotid endarterectomy, compared with white patients, and to have a neurologist as their attending physician.
The neurointerventional devices market encompasses neurothrombectomy devices (suction/aspiration device, clot retriever, and snare device), cerebral angiography and stenting system (carotid stent, and embolic protection system), aneurysm coiling devices (platinum coil, liquid embolic agents, and flow diversion device) and support devices (microcatheter, and microguidewire).
Those with known endocarditis accompanied by focal neurological deficit should be urgently investigated with diagnostic four-vessel cerebral angiography (Bohmfalk et al.
To further delineate how training and credentialing for both cerebral angiography and carotid artery stenting should work, four specialty societies--the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, the Society for Vascular Surgery, the Society for Vascular Medicine and Biology, and the American College of Cardiology--are jointly developing guidelines on the subject.
Of these, four showed no abnormalities present by CT head scans and cerebral angiography.
Neurointerventional procedures can be performed through different techniques such as neurothrombectomy procedure, cerebral angiography and stenting technique, and coiling procedure.
The patient was rapidly transferred to the neurointerventional radiology suite for cerebral angiography and endovascular repair.
For example, when suspected cerebral vasospasm may be the source of the observed metabolic crisis, a less invasive computed tomography (CT) perfusion study may be performed to confirm ischemia before performing cerebral angiography.
In cases of blunt cerebrovascular injury, four-vessel cerebral angiography was performed whenever any of the following findings were observed: an unexplained neurologic deficit inconsistent with CT findings, the presence of Homer syndrome, a LeFort II or III fracture, a cervical spine injury, or a neck soft-tissue injury.