Spondylosis

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Spondylosis

 

a chronic degenerative disease of man affecting the intervertebral joints. With spondylosis, primary changes develop in an intervertebral disk, causing the disk to lose elasticity and flexibility and to become less capable of absorbing shocks. The resulting deformity of the vertebral bodies (with spinous processes on their edges) produces pain, usually because the root of a spinal nerve is compressed by part of an intervertebral disk and the mobility of the affected segment of the spine is limited. The causes of spondylosis are the same as those of spondylarthrosis, and diagnostic and treatment methods are identical.

References in periodicals archive ?
A Medline search at the time of trial planning looking for "back pain" and "eperisone" has shown only a doubleblind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial reporting a benefit of eperisone in patients with cervical spondylosis, with reduction of pain in the nuchal region, back pain, pain in arms and shoulders, and stiffness (15).
This premier issue featured clinical articles on patients with cervical spondylosis, percutaneous cordotomy, hyperirritable carotid sinus mechanism, and traumatic head injury.
Allan I Binder (2007): Cervical spondylosis and neck pain.
A CERVICAL spondylosis is quite a common cause of neck pain, particularly in older people.
Under the agreement terms, the two companies aim to obtain approval for an additional indication of limaprost alfadex, namely the treatment of cervical spondylosis.
Using extensive illustrations and clinical x-ray films, the authors explain the most common spinal disorders, including thoracolumbar trauma, mechanical lower-back pain, prolapsed thoracolumbar intervertebral discs, lumbar spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, infections, tumors, inflammatory arthropathies, disorders of the sacrum and coccyx, cervical spine and related soft-tissue injuries, cervical radiculopathy, cervical spondylosis and myelopathy, the rheumatoid spine, and pediatric spinal conditions.
Patients were divided into one of the following groups on the basis of imaging findings: 1) one- or two-level herniated disc or cervical spondylosis (uncovertebral spurs or osteophytes), 2) multilevel herniated disc/spondylotic disease, or 3) craniocervical junction abnormalities.