Cesar Milstein


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Milstein, César,

1927–2002, Anglo-Argentine immunologist, Ph.D. Cambridge, 1960. He worked (1961–63) at the National Institute of Microbiology, Buenos Aires, but following a military coup he resigned and returned to Cambridge, where he joined the staff of the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, serving as its deputy director from 1988 to 1995, when he retired. In 1975, with Georges KöhlerKöhler, Georges Jean Franz
, 1946–95, German immunologist, Ph.D. Univ. of Freiburg, 1974. He worked (1974–76) with César Milstein at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England.
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, he developed the hybridoma technique for producing monoclonal antibodiesmonoclonal antibody,
an antibody that is mass produced in the laboratory from a single clone and that recognizes only one antigen. Monoclonal antibodies are typically made by fusing a normally short-lived, antibody-producing B cell (see immunity) to a fast-growing cell, such as
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, pure, mass-produced antibodies that recognize only one antigen (see immunityimmunity,
ability of an organism to resist disease by identifying and destroying foreign substances or organisms. Although all animals have some immune capabilities, little is known about nonmammalian immunity.
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). Their method for monoclonal antibody production has since been adopted universally, and such antibodies are used in laboratory research, in medical diagnostics, and in medical treatments to neutralize bacterial toxins. In 1984, Milstein (with Köhler and Niels K. JerneJerne, Niels Kai
, 1911–94, British-Danish immunologist, b. London. He worked at the Danish State Serum Institute (1945–55) and was chief medical officer to the World Health Organization (1956–62).
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) shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Gabriela Brenta, Cesar Milstein Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Prof.
Cesar Milstein had succeeded in generating immortal cell lines that could produce large amounts of monoclonal antibodies, Herzenberg immediately arranged a sabbatical leave so that he could learn this technology from Milstein.
In 1980, Cesar Milstein earned the Nobel Prize for identifying theories and techniques for immunology.
When Cesar Milstein invented monoclonal antibodies or Fred Sanger DNA sequencing, these would not have met Hauser's criteria.