Guizhou

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Guizhou

or

Kweichow

(both: gwā`jō`), province (2010 pop. 34,746,468), c.66,000 sq mi (170,940 sq km), SW China. GuiyangGuiyang
or Kweiyang
, city (1994 est. pop. 1,131,200), capital of Guizhou prov., SW China. On the main road from Kunming to Chongqing, it is also a rail (since 1959) and industrial center.
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 is the capital and chief city; ZunyiZunyi
or Tsunyi
, town (1994 est. pop. 295,200), N Guizhou prov., SW China. It is on the main highway to Sichuan and is the commercial and agricultural distribution center of N Guizhou.
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 and Duyun are important towns. Guizhou is almost entirely a high plateau, and its sheer limestone hills form some of the most spectacular karst scenery in the world. Guizhou has many deep river valleys, notably those of the Wu (the major river), the He, and the Yuan. The climate is mild and the rainfall adequate, but the soil is poor and there is little arable land. Rice is the major crop; the same amount of acreage is given to corn but with about half the yield. Soybeans, wheat, oats, barley, sweet potatoes, sorghum, and beans are raised for food. Commerical crops include rapeseed, tobacco, tea, peanuts, oakleaf silk, sugarcane, and indigo. Cotton is being developed. Guizhou has rich forests, and lumber, tung oil, lacquer, and paint are produced. Mineral resources, which are important to the province, include mercury, coal, iron, zinc, lead, copper, manganese, and gold. With unnavigable rivers, a limited railway system, and well-developed highways, transportation in the province is adequate. The province has two autonomous districts: one in the southeast, peopled by Miao (known for their embroideries) and Dong; and another in the south, inhabited by Puyi and Miao. Chinese settlement of the region began around 2,000 years ago, but it was only in the 10th cent. that it passed under the suzerainty of China. Guizhou became a province in the 17th cent. under the Ming dynasty, but the native Miaos were not completely subdued until about 1870. The traditional name of Guizhou is Kien or Qian. Guizhou Univ. is in Guiyang.

Guizhou

, Kweichow, Kueichou
a province of SW China, between the Yangtze and Xi Rivers: a high plateau. Capital: Guiyang. Pop.: 38 700 000 (2003 est.). Area: 174 000 sq. km (69 278 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
When the narrative switches back to the present with Pi-Yueh Chiang finishing her singing of "Wandering in the Garden" and handing the performance over to Madame Ch'ien to sing "Waking from a Dream," Madame Ch'ien rejects the request and upon Chiang's persistence blushes to reveal that her voice has become too hoarse to sing.
Thus, Christian motifs were introduced in the late-17th century in the Ch'ien Lung factories showing perhaps the Virgin ascending to Heaven in a dragon chariot (the Chinese artists had only a vague idea of the stories they were painting onto the china and so, in a delightfully naive way Christian and pagan motifs were jumbled up together.
One such embarrassment involved Lord Macartney, who led a trade mission to the court of the Emperor Ch'ien Lung in 1793.
Perhaps for this reason, Ch'ien Mu, an eminent Confucian scholar, points out that this dialogue implicitly appeals to the Confucian ideal of t'ien-jen ho-yi, the unity and harmony of humans and Heaven (t'ien).
Isaac Titsingh's embassy to the court of Ch'ien Lung (1794-1795)', THM, 1 (1939), 9-33
Records of the grand historian of China: translations from the Shih chi of Ssu-ma Ch'ien.
acknowledges his preeminence in the Trinity and relates him to the li principle and the principle of ch'ien (heaven) with its four characteristics of origination, success, advantage, and correctness.
it makes him more like T'ao Ch'ien and Su Shih; and less like the hundreds of imitators his everydayness, his earthy celebrations of the moment, have won for him.
220) astrologer and historiographer, Ssu-ma Ch'ien (d.
Raymond Ch'ien was the Chairman of CDC Corporation, and resigned the day before CDC Corporation filed for voluntary bankruptcy;
The most internationally prominent Taiwanese nun, Cheng Yen (1937-), focuses almost exclusively on "doing religion" through charitable activities, while the nuns Kuan Ch'ien (1956-), Wu Yin (1940-), and others have made it their mission to improve the doctrinal sophistication of the sangha through education.
Charles Clarke and Ch'ien Lee, 2004, Pitcher Plants of Sarawak.