Claude Chabrol

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Claude Chabrol
Claude Henri Jean Chabrol
Birthday
BirthplaceSardent, France
Died
Occupation
director, actor, producer, screenwriter

Chabrol, Claude

(klōd shäbrōl`), 1930–2010, French filmmaker, b. Paris, attended Univ. of Paris. One of the creators of the French "new wave" cinema of the 1950s and 60s, he and such other future film greats as Eric RohmerRohmer, Eric,
1920–2010, French film director and writer, b. Jean-Marie Maurice Schérer. He was a founder (1950) of La Gazette du cinéma, cowrote (1957) a study of Alfred Hitchcock, and edited (1957–63) the influential journal
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, Jean-Luc GodardGodard, Jean-Luc
, 1930–, French film director and scriptwriter, b. Paris. He wrote criticism for a number of Parisian cinema journals in the early 1950s before embarking on his filmmaking career. Godard is probably the most influential of the French New Wave directors.
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, and François TruffautTruffaut, François
, 1932–84, French film director and critic. Known in his early 20s as a writer for the influential French film journal Cahiers du Cinéma,
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 wrote film criticism for the influential journal Cahiers du Cinéma in the 1950s. With Rohmer, he wrote a biography of Alfred Hitchcock (1957, tr. 1979). In 1958 he made his first film, Le Beau Serge, which he wrote, produced, and directed. Its dark themes of mystery, violence, and obsession became characteristic of many of his films and reflect the influence of Alfred HitchcockHitchcock, Sir Alfred,
1899–1980, English-American film director, writer, and producer, b. London. Hitchcock began his career as a director in 1925 and became prominent with The 39 Steps (1935) and The Lady Vanishes (1938).
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. This film and the subsequent Les Cousins (1959) are often cited as the first examples of France's new wave movement. In his films Chabrol also explored themes of class and sexuality, often satirizing France's bourgeois tradition, and he developed an elegantly cool and distant style leavened by a sly humor. Among the other works of his early and most successful period are Les Bonnes Femmes (1960), Les Biches (1968), La Femme Infidèle (1969), and This Man Must Die (1969). Extremely prolific, during the 1960s and 70s he averaged two or three works a year. Later highlights of his more than 60 films include the Hitchcockian Le Boucher (1970), Wedding in Blood (1973), Blood Relations (1978), the highly acclaimed Story of Women (1988), Madame Bovary (1991), L'Enfer (1993), the extremely successful thriller La Cérémonie (1995), Merci pour le chocolat (2000), The Bridesmaid (2004), A Girl Cut in Two (2007), and the suspenseful Bellamy (2009), his last film.

Bibliography

See studies by R. Wood and M. Walker (1970) and G. Austin (1999).

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