Chador


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Chador

 

a white, blue, or, sometimes, black covering in which Muslim women used to wrap themselves from head to foot when they left the house. Only the eyes remained uncovered. The criador was worn by a number of peoples in Iran, Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, and the Arab countries, including Yemen and Iraq. It was used mainly in the cities. The chador is still worn by some women in Iran, Afghanistan, and certain Arab countries.

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BEIRUT: A forlorn-looking woman in black chador cradles the lifeless body of a nude young man, recalling Michelangelo's depiction of the Virgin Mary draping her son's lifeless form across her lap in "The Pieta.
Evoking the labyrinth of mirages she met in her quest for the truth, Forouhar created a poster called Blind Spot, showing the back of a bald male head in a chador, which normally women wear.
While I see the burqa/niqab issue as rather simple and straightforward, the hijab (traditional headscarf) and chador (a cloak-like robe that doesn't cover the face) are decidedly less so.
Rikta Tripura, a sales representative of a textile, said they have earned over Tk 2 lakh only in last two months selling local cottage products including Thami, Gamcha, Lungi, Chador, shirts, moneybags and other things.
I find myself in this position, despite the apparent contradiction, because I believe that the niqab, burqa and chador, and any other garment that covers a woman's entire body, are a form of oppression, nay, blasphemy against the noblest of human values and relationships.
Three years later, the issue of my arranged marriage is still unresolved, and I sometimes feet torn over issues like whether to continue wearing a chador, the traditional.
In the period in question, state-owned miner Chador Malu produced 8.
7 during anti-government demonstrations and pictures of him wearing the chador, the women's full-length black wrap, were published on the semi-official Fars news agency, which reported that Tavakoli attempted to flee Iran dressed as a woman.
Its campaign poster showed the Swiss flag covered in missile-like minarets and the portrait of a woman covered with a black chador and veil associated with strict Islam.
They eventually revealed themselves after removing their Arab-style chador disguises.
The newly-opened exhibition, Sisters in Chanel & Chador, is a colourful collection which challenges western assumptions about the Middle East.
IT IS called IRAN: SISTERS IN CHANEL AND CHADOR and the final major exhibition in the Tees Valley Museums Festival Of Photography comes as a huge surprise that nobody should miss.