Chagas' disease


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

Chagas' disease,

disease of South and Central America caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It usually affects children and young adults and is transmitted by the feces of infected insects, typically the assassin bugassassin bug,
common name for members of the family Reduviidae, one of the largest and most varied groups belonging to the order Hemiptera (suborder Heteroptera). Assassin bugs are generally brownish to black, medium-sized to large insects, with heads that are elongate and
..... Click the link for more information.
. Most of those infected have mild symptoms, such as fever and swelling and redness around the eyes, but from 10% to 30% develop chronic disease that may result in serious or fatal inflammation of the brain and heart tissues; persons with the disease also have an increased risk for stroke as they age as a result of heart problems. There is no vaccine and no satisfactory treatment. The incidence of Chagas' disease in the United States has increased since the 1970s, possibly because of increased immigration from Mexico and Central America, where the incidence is very high. In immunosuppressed patients (see AIDSAIDS
or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome,
fatal disease caused by a rapidly mutating retrovirus that attacks the immune system and leaves the victim vulnerable to infections, malignancies, and neurological disorders. It was first recognized as a disease in 1981.
..... Click the link for more information.
) Chagas' disease can form a mass in the cranial cavity that mimics a tumor, presumably because the lymphocytes that guard against the parasite are the same that are depleted by the AIDS virus. See also trypanosometrypanosome
, microscopic, one-celled protozoan of the genus Trypanosoma, typically living as an active parasite in the bloodstream of a vertebrate; hundreds of species are known. A trypanosome is long and pointed and possesses a flagellum.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Chagas' disease

[′shäg·əs di‚zēz]
(medicine)
An acute and chronic protozoan disease of humans caused by the hemoflagellate Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi. Also known as South American trypanosomiasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Jose Fiandor of GSK said: "The collaboration with the University of Dundee and this funding from Wellcome are vital boosts towards the achievement of our five-year goal of producing new preclinical candidates for leishmaniasis and Chagas' disease.
Exacerbation of HIV viral load simultaneous with asymptomatic reactivation of chronic Chagas' disease.
Chagas' disease is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T.
Antiparasitical chemotherapy in Chagas' disease cardiomyopathy: current evidence.
Vosaconazole has shown considerable activity in murine models of acute and chronic Chagas' disease, and this effect was expected to be reproducible in humans; unfortunately, however, only suppressive activity was shown," said Dr.
Prognostic implications of clinical, electrocardiographic and hemodynamic findings in chronic Chagas' disease.
Electrocardiographically it is frequently noticed disturbances of ventricular repolarization in acute Chagas' disease (7, 10-13), which indicate that acute Chagas' myocardiopathy could be considered an ischemic disease; indeed pattern of wall motion abnormalities and delayed enhancement determined by Cardiac magnetic resonance in Chagas' disease patients may mimic ischemic cardiomyopathies, with especial predilection for the apical and inferolateral segments of the left ventricle (14).
Several studies evidenced that no etiological treatment is totally efficient in the chronic phase of Chagas' disease (FILARDI; BRENER, 1987; BRENER, 2000; PRATA, 2001; COURA, 2009).
Allison 2004 A 9,000-year record of Chagas' disease.
Specific insects carry specific diseases, the report notes: "kissing bugs carry Chagas' disease [which leads to swelling and pontential life-threatening heart and digestive disorders], mosquitoes bring malaria and sand flies transmit leishmaniasis [resulting in large skin sores that can later bring spleen and liver damage].
The prevalence of Chagas' disease in puerperal women and congenital transmission in an endemic area of Peru.
Anez N, Carrasco H, Parada H, Crisante G, Rojas A, Gonzalez N, Ramirez JL, Guevara P, Rivero C, Borges R, Scorza JV (1999a) Acute Chagas' Disease in western Venezuela: A clinical, seroparasitologic and epidemiologic study.