Chaga

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Chaga

 

a fungus of the family Polyporaceae that develops as a growth on the trunks of trees, mainly birch. Befungin, an extract of chaga, is used for the treatment of certain gastrointestinal diseases and is administered as a tonic. It sometimes alleviates the condition of patients with malignant tumors.

References in periodicals archive ?
But it is true that today, Chagga culture has crumbled and is dead.
In order to plant these new varieties, the residents of Chagga Gardens would have to remove the surrounding vegetation.
Alex will spend five weeks in the East African country during which time he will teach English to the children of the Chagga tribe and help build a new school canteen.
A chawn ei weld yn dysgu sut mae gwneud coffi yng nghwmni ffermwyr o lwyth y Chagga, sy'n byw ar lethrau mynydd Kilimanjaro.
Topics include the politics and reception of Petros Lamula's UZulukaMalandela, which cast the Zulu as the Children of Israel awaiting deliverance from the white oppressor, Harry Nkumbula and the promotion of Zambian nationalism, the influence of European anthropology on Chagga authors of northeastern Tanzania, dissident historical writing in postcolonial Uganda and Zambia, and historical writing and the promotion of national culture in Senegal.
The analysis indicated that, along with decreasing rainfall and shorter rainy seasons, the decline of coffee production as a cash crop, and a change in the traditional carbohydrate diet from bananas to maize, was leading the local Chagga people to cut down the taller trees in the agro-forestry system.
What might be legitimate attempts to incorporate ethnic and cultural aspects of people like the Chagga (Gutmann) and the Kate (Keysser) in the manner sketched out by Warneck, was used by Afrikaner theologians to bolster a separate ethnic approach to black Africans which denied the catholicity of a mixed-race congregation and became for Bosch "totally incompatible" with the community of Jesus.
Their neighbours, the very fruity Chaggas of Tanzania, are even keener.
In Central America Japanese volunteers and experts from the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) are helping to combat the deadly chaggas disease while in China and Myanmar other specialists from the Japan Disaster Relief (JDR) system recently helped some of the hundreds of thousands of victims of an earthquake and cyclone which struck those regions.