Chalcedon


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Chalcedon

(kăl`sĭdŏn, –dən, kălsē`dən), ancient Greek city of Asia Minor, on the Bosporus. It was founded by Megara on the shore opposite Byzantium in 685 B.C. Taken by the Persians and recovered by the Greeks, it was later a possession of the kings of Bithynia, from whom it passed (A.D. 74) to Rome. The Council of Chalcedon was held there in A.D. 451. The site is in the suburbs of İstanbul.
References in periodicals archive ?
An alternative metaphysic for reading Chalcedon must be based on a dynamic interpretation of Chalcedonian terminology.
In 1965, Rushdoony founded the Chalcedon Foundation in Vallecito, California, as an "educational organization devoted to research, publishing, and promoting Christian reconstruction in all areas of life.
But during the last decades important bilateral dialogues between the two "families" have led to full doctrinal agreement, including on issues which have divided them since Chalcedon, so that mutual full recognition can be expected soon.
The most famous example, of course, is our understanding of the import of Canon 28 of Chalcedon, which has been seen by most commentators to be an important step in the fractious relationship between the Western papacy and the Eastern patriarchate.
He elucidates at length Gregory's incarnational theology of "mingling" and "erasis," terms later condemned at Chalcedon.
In the second chapter, "The Emergence of Canonical Legislation," Hess surveys the legislation promulgated by the various councils that met until Chalcedon, providing a useful, though increasingly brief, treatment of their canons (Nicaea is allotted two pages; Ephesus and Chalcedon, together, one paragraph), and a description of the various canonical collections, to the time of John Scholasticus and the subsequent Nomocanon in Fourteen titles, in the East, and Dionysius Exiguus in the West.
a founder of the right-wing Chalcedon Institute -- which advocates the death penalty for homosexuality -- and the Rutherford Institute.
Without such a principle neither the christological dogma of Chalcedon nor the social inequality that manifests itself in political oppression can be resolved.
As the various versions of what now exists in English as Christ in Christian Tradition, volume one, have dominated our understanding of the development of Christology in the patristic period up to Chalcedon for now almost half a century, so the magnificent extension of this work will prove near definitive for the whole patristic period until well into the next millennium.
For faithful Catholic Christians, the view of Christ laid out in the Gospel of John and the Council of Chalcedon makes human existence sacramental: the Word became flesh.