Chaldea


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Related to Chaldea: Chaldean, Persia

Chaldea

, Chaldaea
1. an ancient region of Babylonia; the land lying between the Euphrates delta, the Persian Gulf, and the Arabian desert
2. another name for Babylonia

Chaldea

ancient Mesopotamian land where study of astrology developed. [Ancient Hist.: NCE, 499]
References in periodicals archive ?
Ten years later, he spoke, grandiosely, of settling "the account with Egypt, Assyria and Chaldea on behalf of our ancestors.
Things looked up in the next generation, when Flight delivered a capable filly in Chaldea and a classier one in Cheval Volant.
46) According to the area's oral tradition, the monastery, which is generally considered to be the starting-point of Yezidism, was initially dedicated to Mar-Addai, one of the seventy-two disciples of Christ and the evangelizer of Chaldea.
The basic instruments that had come down from ancient Chaldea, Babylon, and Egypt were not being discarded, only complemented with refined, efficient, and accurate machinery.
Although Jews "descended from one stock," Smith observed, they are fair in Britain and Germany, brown in France and Turkey, swarthy in Portugal and Spain, olive in Syria and Chaldea, and tawny or copper in Arabia and Egypt.
In fact, Peladan's pastorale Le Fils des etoiles, for which Satie composed the music, took place in Chaldea, a civilization reputed to have set forth a mathematical proportion as an aesthetic principle.
Looking back, then, it will be seen that medieval mineralogy had its origin in classical sources and especially in Pliny, who in his turn gathered his material from earlier Greek writers, whose works, except those of Theophrastus, have been lost long since, as well as from a body of local gossip and tradition, which in its turn was probably derived from still more ancient and occult sources in Chaldea and elsewhere in the far east.
From this state of spiritually inverted captivity Blake's poem records the flights of the faithful - Abram from Chaldea and Har and Heva from Africa.
There are a few stray crumbs--Sumeria, Chaldea, Egypt--nothing much.
Maspero, Gaston, A History of Egypt, Chaldea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Vol.
Josephus seems to allude to a similar tradition, though without mentioning Habakkuk: "And when they persevered in the same course of life, God raised up war against them from the king of Babylon and Chaldea, who sent an army against Judea, and laid waste the country; and caught king Manasseh by treachery, and ordered him to be brought to him.
The work pretends to be an ancient document excavated in Chaldea, the Mesopotamian region that was a rich archeological resource during the Higher Criticism, the recent trend in Biblical philology which sought to authenticate Jesus through the corroboration of pre-Christian documents.