Retinospora

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Retinospora

 

(also Retinispora), a unique form occurring in coniferous plants of the family Cupressaceae. The plants, which are used in ornamental horticulture, have acerate needles that are declinate from the branches. (Such needles do not normally characterize adult plants of the family Cupressaceae.) Young plants raised from the seeds of the dwarf cypress or, less often, the seeds of cypress or arborvitae are propagated by cuttings. If the cuttings are made at a very early age, the acerate leaves are retained for several years and are then replaced by the usual scalelike needles. This phenomenon does not occur with propagation by seeds. At one time the plants were erroneously thought to be an independent genus.

References in periodicals archive ?
The pollination mechanism of Chamaecyparis nootkatensis.
Major termiticidal components of heartwood of Port- Orford-cedar, Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (A.
Atlantic white-cedar, Chamaecyparis thyoides (family Cupressaceae), is New Jersey's only obligate wetland tree species.
And don't think of green alone --remember to include the blues, such as the Colorado blue spruces, and the yellows, such as Chamaecyparis lawsoniana, in your winter palette.
Predicting and Mapping the Spatial Distribution of Chamaecyparis Formosensis in Central Taiwan in a GIS with Species Distribution Models.
Another variety, chamaecyparis pisifera boulevard, presents billowing tufts of blue foliage like a cloud.
Chamaecyparis 'Ellwoodi' or 'are slow-growing enough to rs.
Growing right up against a corner of the house is a giant Chamaecyparis, or false cypress.
This process is important because it allows the subsequent development of the embryo, especially in seeds characterized by a morphological dormancy (Immature embryo), like Chamaecyparis nootkatensis seeds.
In troughs and raised beds add at least one winter evergreen, such as dwarf or slow growing conifer such as Chamaecyparis Compacta.
In the course of screening for PP2C activators from natural sources, we isolated abietane-type diterpenes, pisiferdiol and pisiferic acid from Chamaecyparis pisifera.
With respect to species, it is estimated that about 40 percent of Japanese softwood lumber was sugi (Japanese cedar, Cryptomeria japonica); 24 percent was any type of imported spruce, pine, and fir (SPF), including SPF from Canada and European Whitewood (Norway spruce, Picea abies); 10 percent was Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii); 9 percent was hinoki (Japanese cypress, Chamaecyparis obtusa); and 8 percent was Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi).