Chamaedaphne

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Chamaedaphne

 

(also Cassandra), a genus of evergreen shrubs of the family Ericaceae. The plants are 17 to 100 cm tall. The leathery leaves and the branchlets are covered on both sides with peltate scales. The flowers are white, gamopetalous, urceolate-campanulate, and drooping; they are gathered in unilateral leafy racemes at the ends of the branches. The fruit is a capsule. The genus has one species—the leatherleaf (C. calyculata) —which grows in Northern Eurasia, North America (as far south as the Allegheny Mountains), and, less commonly, Japan. The leatherleaf is typical of tundras and upstream, mainly sphagnum, swamps; it is also found in damp forests and along rivers and lakes. The leaves and young shoots contain the glycoside andromedotoxin, which is poisonous to sheep and goats.

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bartlettianum, Chamaedaphne calyculata, Carex oligosperma and Woodwardia virginica.
The Sphagnum-dominated substrate of Stage IV was occupied by Menyanthes trifoliata, Chamaedaphne calyculata, Scirpus sp.
magellanicum, Woodwardia virginica, Chamaedaphne calyculata, Toxicodendron vernix, Acer rubrum and Vaccinium corymbosum.
Chamaedaphne calyculata is occasional between the tall-shrub thickets.
Chamaedaphne calyculata, Vaccinium macrocarpon and increased wood fragments.
Characteristic plants included Andromeda glaucophylla, Betula pumila, Carex oligosperma, Carex trisperma, Chamaedaphne calyculata, Coptis trifolia, Drosera spp.
Extremely mineral-rich fens in Indiana are characterized by a dense, low growth of Potentilla fruticosa, the fen counterpart of Chamaedaphne calyculata.
All leatherleaf bogs are characterized by a low shrub cover of Chamaedaphne calyculata.
Both representatives in this study (Blueberry and Thompson Bogs), have remnant, depauperate specimens of Chamaedaphne calyculata surviving in the few patches where shrubs have not crowded them into extinction.