Chamaeleon


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Related to Chamaeleon: Chamaeleo chamaeleon

Chamaeleon

(kă-mee -lee-ŏn) A small inconspicuous constellation in the southern hemisphere near Crux, the brightest stars being of 4th magnitude. Abbrev.: Cha; genitive form: Chamaeleontis; approx. position: RA 11h, dec –80°; area: 132 sq deg.

Chamaeleon

 

a constellation near the south celestial pole. It contains no stars brighter than a visual stellar magnitude of 4.0. It is not visible in the USSR.

Chamaeleon

[kə′mēl·yən]
(astronomy)
A constellation, right ascension 11 hours, declination 80°S. Abbreviated Cha. Also spelled Chameleon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chrysonotomyia chamaeleon (Girault): Boucek, 1988: 723.
chamaeleon se desarrolla como koinobionte o idiobionte, aunque se cree que debido a su amplio rango de tamano, pero su reducida variacion en el tiempo de desarrollo, es mas probable el tipo de desarrollo idiobionte (Protasov et al.
Primera cita de Closterocerus chamaeleon Girault (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae), parasitoide de Ophelimius maskelli Ashmead (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae) en la provincial de Huelva (So Espana).
Presence of the Eucalyptus gall wasp Ophelimus maskelli and its parasitoid Closterocerus chamaeleon in Portugal: First record, geographic distribution and host preference.
Dispersal rate and parasitism by Closterocerus chamaeleon (Girault) after its release in Sicily to control Ophelimus maskelli (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae).
Primera cita de la Argentina de Ophelimius maskelli (Ashmed) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) y su parasitoide, Closterocerus chamaeleon (Girault) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).
Biological control of the eucalyptus gall wasp Ophellmus maskelli (Ashmead): Taxonomy and biology of the parasitoid Closterocerus chamaeleon (Girault), with information on its establishment in Israel.
The starry Chamaeleon stares into the night sky with two wide-open eyes, so to speak, represented by the magnitude 4 alpha and magnitude 4.
The galaxy NGC 2915 can be imagined to be riding on the back of the starry Chamaeleon.
Nicely tucked underneath the belly of Chamaeleon is the very faint galaxy, NGC 3149, situated 1.
The constellation Chamaeleon is also home to a dark nebula which has been listed as Sa 156 in Sandqvist's Catalogue of Dark Nebulae, published in 1977.
Chamaeleon seems to have more than its share of naked-eye pairs; both d1 and e are very close telescopic doubles to boot.