Chamorros


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Chamorros

 

the indigenous population of the Mariana Islands, in Western Micronesia. Decimated in the 17th century by Spanish colonists, the Chamorros spoke a Malayo-Polynesian language. They engaged in land cultivation and were evidently at the stage of the disintegration of the primitive communal system. A small number of the surviving Chamorros intermarried with the Spanish and with the Filipinos and Mexicans serving in the Spanish armed forces. The name “Chamorros” is now applied to the resulting group, which is made up of métis and has retained the old language. According to a 1971 estimate, the Chamorros number approximately 65,000. They engage primarily in land cultivation and are nearly all Roman Catholics.

REFERENCES

Narody Avstraliii Okeanii. Moscow, 1956. (Bibliography, p. 791.)
Puchkov, P. I. Naselenie Okeanii. Moscow, 1967.
References in periodicals archive ?
Once the Spanish won the religious battle, Chamorros were generally free to go about their lives of raising their families and tending to their farms (Sanchez 1988; Rogers 1995).
Of 171,019 people, in Guam, Chamorros are the largest population at 37 percent.
They are a part of the GVB's "Show Us Your Chamorro" campaign intended to celebrate the Chamorro spirit and connect with Chamorros to keep them apprised of special activities on Guam in 2013.
For example, one respondent in higher education suggested that Chamorros are "not a hyphenated people" but that being indigenous necessarily includes multiple identities.
These data together indicate that the origin of the Chamorro people of the Marianas was elsewhere in Island Southeast Asia (ISEA), and south of Luzon.
Guam is a spiritual place where Chamorros believe in a vigorous spiritual presence melded with Catholic dogma taught by the earliest Spanish missionaries.
This said, it must of course be acknowledged that circumstances over which the Chamorros have had no control loom large in Guam's history.
A suspect for a time was the author's favorite plant, the cycad tree, whose seed, despite being toxic, is used to make a form of flour the Chamorros call fadang or federico.
And the Chamorros suffered from parkinsonism and Alzheimer-type dementia too.
The fiestas combine the traditions of the Chamorros -- who first came to the island from southeast Asia about 3,000 years ago -- and the Spanish, who colonized Guam in the 1500's.
Although Native Hawaiians, Samoans and Guamanians or Chamorros were the largest detailed Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone or in any combination groups, they grew at slower rates than many of the smaller detailed NHPI groups.
However, it was not until the rapidly shifting geopolitics after World War II that the US government paid attention to the demands of the Chamorros people of Guam.