Chamorros


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Chamorros

 

the indigenous population of the Mariana Islands, in Western Micronesia. Decimated in the 17th century by Spanish colonists, the Chamorros spoke a Malayo-Polynesian language. They engaged in land cultivation and were evidently at the stage of the disintegration of the primitive communal system. A small number of the surviving Chamorros intermarried with the Spanish and with the Filipinos and Mexicans serving in the Spanish armed forces. The name “Chamorros” is now applied to the resulting group, which is made up of métis and has retained the old language. According to a 1971 estimate, the Chamorros number approximately 65,000. They engage primarily in land cultivation and are nearly all Roman Catholics.

REFERENCES

Narody Avstraliii Okeanii. Moscow, 1956. (Bibliography, p. 791.)
Puchkov, P. I. Naselenie Okeanii. Moscow, 1967.
References in periodicals archive ?
But, as any Guamanian or Chamorro would say, it's never about the size.
For some on Guam, the turmoil calls into question what it means to be Chamorro on an island where religion is for many inseparable from indigenous culture.
In 1669, a year after they arrived, San Vitores reported that there were no distilled spirits in Guam and that the Chamorros drank only rice water with shredded coconut, despite the shipwrecked Filipinos who had lived there for 23 years.
Como tratare de demostrar en este ensayo los chamorros no fueron simples victimas del colonialismo, sino que se apropiaron de las costumbres y creencias foraneas, para incorporarlas a las suyas propias.
For example, one respondent in higher education suggested that Chamorros are "not a hyphenated people" but that being indigenous necessarily includes multiple identities.
In the pre-European contact era, the local economy was self-sustaining through farming and fishing, and Chamorros lived abundantly off the land and sea.
Of 171,019 people, in Guam, Chamorros are the largest population at 37 percent.
For example, the Chamorros population of Guam and Rota in the western Pacific have an unusually high prevalence of motor neuron disease, a syndrome that includes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), parkinsonism, and progressive dementia.
The Chamorros -- the native people of Guam -- believe the spirits of the ancients live in Banyan trees that flourish in the island's jungles.
Occupied by eighteen thousand Japanese civilians and over eight thousand Japanese army and navy forces prior to World War II, the island gradually lost its indigenous people, known as Chamorros.