Lord Chancellor

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Lord Chancellor

Brit Government the cabinet minister who is head of the judiciary in England and Wales and Speaker of the House of Lords
References in periodicals archive ?
The Pope's choice: Sir Thomas More, Chancellor of England, martyr for the unity of the Church, and for the integrity of the individual conscience.
A rebellious fairy marries a young mortal who becomes Lord Chancellor of England.
Acton was the seat of power of Robert Burnell, Bishop of Bath and Wells, Chancellor of England and the most important man in the kingdom, next to Edward I himself.
He gave us an insight into the life and times of Bessie Surtees, her family history and the story of her elopement with the young man who eventually became Lord Chancellor of England.
He began attacking Martin Luther's dogmas and represented the king, becoming 'sorter-out and placer of the principal matters and then Chancellor of England in 1529.
Thomas Wolsey introduced him to court and when Wolsey fell from grace in 1529, More (with some reluctance) replaced his old mentor as Chancellor of England, the highest political office in the land.
Anniversaries: 1558: French recaptured Calais from the English; 1610: Galileo discovered the four satellites of Jupiter; 1618: Francis Bacon became Lord Chancellor of England and was later fined pounds 40,000 after being accused of taking a bribe; 1880: Birth of Western film cowboy actor Tom Mix; 1927: The transatlantic telephone service between New York and London opened; 1967: The Forsyte Saga television serialisation began on BBC 1; 1975: OPEC agreed to raise crude oil prices by ten per cent creating a tidal wave of of world economic inflation and near-bankruptcy for developing nations; 1988: Death of actor Trevor Howard; 1990: Safety problems closed the Leaning Tower of Pisa to the public for the first time since it opened around 1275.
Bishop Burnell was one of the most influential figures in England, serving as Lord Chancellor of England as well as Bishop of Bath & Wells before his death in 1293.
The Lord High Chancellor of England heads, (but only nominally), the most arbitrary, despotic and arrogant department of central Government.

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