Chandelier


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Chandelier

A fixture with multiple arms hung from the ceiling to support lights; originally for candles, but later manufactured for gas, then electric lights.

chandelier

A luminaire suspended from the ceiling; usually ornate or branched with the lamps visible.
References in classic literature ?
The chandelier had crashed down upon the head of the wretched woman who had come to the Opera for the first time in her life, the one whom M.
There is a fine chandelier in that holland bag," I said coaxingly.
The furniture, the ornaments, the chandeliers, the carpets, were all new and bright and costly.
The old wintry branches of chandeliers in the room where the mouldering table was spread, had been lighted while we were out, and Miss Havisham was in her chair and waiting for me.
I won't bear it," said Jane with a sob and a plunge upon the sofa that made the lustres of the chandeliers rattle.
The splendid chandeliers and lustres of the drawing-room were lighted for the same reason as the lamps in the glittering retail stores of Broadway; and the brilliant effect of the taste of the young ladies was intended much like the nightly lustre of the lottery- offices, to tempt adventurers to try their chances.
Two small glass chandeliers were suspended at equal distances between the stove and outer doors, one of which opened at each end of the hall, and gilt lustres were affixed to the frame work of the numerous side-doors that led from the apartment.
The huge and unmeaning glass chandeliers, prism-cut, gas-lighted, and without shade, which dangle in our most fashionable drawing-rooms, may be cited as the quintessence of all that is false in taste or preposterous in folly.
Then is there a singular kind of parallel between her and the little glass chandeliers of another age embellishing that assembly-room, which, with their meagre stems, their spare little drops, their disappointing knobs where no drops are, their bare little stalks from which knobs and drops have both departed, and their little feeble prismatic twinkling, all seem Volumnias.
Now, this private hotel of mine was a very old fashioned house, dark and dingy all day long, with heavy old chandeliers and black old oak, and dead flowers in broken flower-pots surrounding a grimy grass-plot in the rear.
I can see the chandeliers, and the green silk of the piano, and Mamma sitting in her cashmere shawl by the window, singing till the little ragamuffin boys outside stopped to listen.
Clouds of tobacco smoke rolled and wavered high in air about the dull gilt of the chandeliers.