Chandler wobble


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Chandler wobble

(chand -ler) A small continuous variation in the location of the geographic poles on the Earth's surface. It leads to a variation of latitude of points on the Earth because latitude is measured from the equator midway between the poles. It does not affect the celestial coordinates of a body. The variation in polar location is resolved into two almost circular components, one (diameter: 6 meters; period: 12 months) resulting from seasonal changes in ice, snow, and atmospheric mass distribution; the second (diameter: 3–15 meters; period: 428 days) is believed to arise from movements of material within the Earth.

Chandler wobble

[′chand·lər ‚wäb·əl]
(geophysics)
A movement in the earth's axis of rotation, the period of motion being about 14 months. Also known as Eulerian nutation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The wobble in Earth's axis of rotation is a combination of two major components: Chandler wobble, thought to arise as Earth is not rigid, and another is the annual wobble, related to Earth's orbit around the sun.
Mystery solved: Long-term fluctuations in pressure at the ocean's bottom appear to drive the Chandler wobble, which causes the North Pole to wander a path of about 20 feet every 14 months (158: 111).
These elements combine in an effect known as the Chandler wobble to create polar motion.
In the mid-1990s, scientists of TUM and BKG joined forces with researchers at New Zealand's University of Canterbury to develop a simpler method that would be capable of continuously tracking the Chandler wobble and annual wobble.
By itself, the Chandler wobble 0would cause the pole to move back and forth about 20 feet every 14 months.
He then compared these figures with the power needed to produce the Chandler wobble that scientists measured between 1985 and 1995.
About two-thirds of the power driving the Chandler wobble probably comes from pressure changes on the ocean floor.
Because of a puzzling phenomenon called the Chandler wobble, they will probably sit about 10 meters apart.
The term Chandler wobble refers to Earth's motion around its axis of rotation.
The effect was anticipated in 1862 by Lord Kelvin, and has since been observed to at least partially cause the earth's annual wobble and the 14-month Chandler wobble.
Centuries later, scientists discovered that there are subtle variations in this height caused by the circular excursions of the earth's spin axis relative to its solid crust -- a motion called the Chandler wobble (SN: 10/24/81, p.
By improving the accuracy of these measurements scientists hope to resolve the debate over which forces drive the Chandler wobble.