chantry

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chantry

A chapel within a church, endowed for religious services for the soul of the donor or others he may designate.
References in periodicals archive ?
50) The chantry chapel enclosing the Tong monument, which was founded by Sir Henry Vernon, was not completed until 1517.
As it happens, so too did the mutilated reredos in the chantry chapel, also at Salisbury, to the north of the latter.
The first part looks at work done on churches in the diocese of Le Mans in the late sixteenth century and on Lutheran churches in Schleswig as well as nineteenth-century chantry chapels, immigrant churches in Norwich and the Huguenot influence.
The Trinity Chapel (1357) and the later Founders Chapel (1397) are both chantry chapels - church spaces dedicated to masses for the founder's soul - a common feature of the 14th century, presumably as a response to the Black Death that advanced through Britain and in particular through the gates of Gloucester between 1348 and 1350.
And there''s a marvellous contrast between the chantry chapels - occupied by medieval prelates who had the spare cash to endow an Oxbridge college - and a humble bronze of William Walker, a diver whose heroic work early in the 20th century saved the cathedral from subsiding into the Itchen floodplain.
The land-based endowment is a legacy of the school's establishment during the Reformation, when it was founded from the revenues of the parish chantry chapels of St Mary and St Katherine.
Their memorials, in the form of chantry chapels, funeral monuments and brasses, chart the development of a more diverse society which held the individualistic attitudes that were to characterize the Renaissance.
It had at least two chantry chapels where masses were said for the dead, possibly at some distance from the church.
And there's a marvellous contrast between the chantry chapels - occupied by medieval prelates who had the spare cash to endow an Oxbridge college - and a humble bronze of William Walker, a diver whose heroic work early in the 20th century saved the cathedral from subsiding into the Itchen floodplain.
Later came an obsession with death and purgatory and a multiplication of chantry chapels, murals, stained glass, processions and mystery plays, all designed to present the Gospel extra-liturgically.
Chantry chapels, built to say mass for the souls of the dead, were also a feature of the Perpendicular period, but from the mid-16th century when this style of architecture ended, there was not much new church building because of the English Reformation, which led not only to a great reconstruction of churches but also the destruction of chantry chapels.