Chappaquiddick


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Chappaquiddick

car driven by Senator Edward Kennedy plunges off bridge; woman companion dies (1969). [Am. Hist.: Facts (1969), 452]
See: Scandal
References in periodicals archive ?
1969: Senator Edward Kennedy crashed his car into the Chappaquiddick River near Martha's Vineyard on America's east coast.
1969: Senator Edward Kennedy's political career is in doubt after he pleads guilty to leaving the scene of a Crime following the Chappaquiddick car crash.
1969 The car Ted Kennedy, above, had been driving when it drove off a bridge at Chappaquiddick, was discovered along with the body of his passenger Mary Jo Kopechne, 28.
left a party on Chappaquiddick Island near Martha's Vineyard with Mary Jo Kopechne, 28; some time later, Kennedy's car went off a bridge into the water.
In the West, there are police reports and thousands of articles and books about scandals like the drowning of Mary Jo Kopechne in Lake Chappaquiddick with Ted Kennedy, who swam and survived, or the scandal involving British Defense Secretary John Profumo and Christine Keeler, or Bill Clinton and White House intern Monica Lewinsky.
Kennedy admitted leaving the scene of the accident on Chappaquiddick Island in the US and was handed a two-month suspended sentence.
TED KENNEDY TRAGEDY struck again when Ted Kennedy was involved in a car accident in 1969 and crashed off a bridge into a river in Chappaquiddick, drowning his secretary Mary Joe Kopekne.
From our next stop, Edgartown - a very smart, upmarket place where our B&B was the elegant Jonathan Munroe House - we hired bikes and made the 60-second ferry crossing to Chappaquiddick Island.
That Gene Pope buried a story on the cover-up of Mary Jo Kopechne's death when Ted Kennedy drove his car off Chappaquiddick Bridge, in hopes that Kennedy would someday help him gain access to the Kennedys he believed his readers really cared about: Jackie Kennedy and her two children, Caroline and John Jr.
Nixon won a landslide election that might have been different if Ted Kennedy had not driven his car off the bridge at Chappaquiddick or Big Ed had campaigned a bit more in these two minor states and left the big ones he was canvassing in the early days until later.
There is ample reason to believe that the Kennedy campaign was beginning to enter the domain of losses, all stemming from that indelible black mark on his past, Chappaquiddick.
That Courtwright intends to go easy on the Democrats is evident on page 2, where he denies Mary Jo Kopechne the dignity of a name, describing her only as the "blonde passenger" Ted Kennedy killed in the Chappaquiddick bridge episode.