charged particle

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charged particle

[′chärjd ′pärd·ə·kəl]
(particle physics)
A particle whose charge is not zero; the charge of a particle is added to its designation as a superscript, with particles of charge +1 and -1 (in terms of the charge of the proton) denoted by + and - respectively; for example, π+, Σ-.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been shown by several authors over decades that the center of charge and center of mass of charged particle are not one and the same but they are separated by a distance of the order of Compton wavelength of the particle.
Solar wind is a stream of charged particles from the sun.
Lawrence added that they can observe charged particles from the Sun closer to Earth we can, but analyzing them can be a challenge as their journey is affected by magnetic fields.
In this region, the stream of charged particles from the sun, known as the solar wind, abruptly slowed down from supersonic speeds and became turbulent.
When the charged particles strike gases high in the sky, light is produced.
3] Charged particles carried from the sun collide with Earth's magnetism.
Because no signal can travel farther than light can in a given period of time, the rapid variation of the April flares indicates that the charged particles were revved up within a tiny region of the vast Crab no bigger than the solar system.
Integrated Engineering Software, a leading developer of hybrid simulation tools for electromagnetic, thermal and structural design analysis, has announced that its Lorentz simulation software now includes meniscus calculations for charged particle extraction from a plasma source.
The charged particles interact only with electric and magnetic fields before striking the detectors.
These particles are known as solar wind and are quickly- moving charged particles emitted from the Sun.
A small number of facilities around the world deliver radiation with charged particles such as protons and heavy ions (figure 5).
The mission, to launch from Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, will collect invisible, charged particles flung from the sun and return in 2004.