care

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Related to Charity care: uncompensated care

CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
In it he asked the executives detailed questions regarding the type of charity care being provided.
When physicians don't provide charity care, poor people end up in hospital emergency rooms or at tax-funded health clinics, of which there are about 50 throughout Los Angeles County.
Lewis-Sidime points to Resurrection's charity care figures as evidence that its attempts to inform patients about the service simply aren't enough.
However, studies suggest that the provision of and information about available charity care varies across communities regardless of state laws requiring hospitals to provide free services to those in need (Cunningham & Kemper, 1998; Feder, Levitt, O'Brien, & Rowland, 2001; Kelly, 1998; 1999; Weiss & Campo, 2001).
6 million of that in pure charity care, $4 million in free health screenings and educational programming, the rest in subsidizing the costs of federal Medicaid and Medicare programs that don't pay the full cost of care.
The financial performance variables analyzed in this study included capital structure, profitability, commercial activity and charity care.
ABSTRACT: In November 1990, the Texas Attorney General filed a lawsuit against The Methodist Hospital System, alleging that it had failed in its duty to provide enough charity care to poor people.
Several studies show that hospitals' community charity care rate has decreased in recent years, while hospital revenues have increased.
This study examines how these expansions affected CA hospitals, assessing changes in hospital payer mix, charity care, bad debt, and financial margins.
Well, the majority of our community benefit investment was spent on providing charity care, so that's free care or discounted care to people who need it.
Last year, its four hospitals in Northern California and two in Southern California provided more than $159 million in uncompensated care and services to people living in poverty, in addition to $22 million in traditional charity care, according to Issai's office.