care

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Related to Charity care: uncompensated care

CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
Last year, the hospital's charity care applications declined slightly, which may reflect the overall trend of fewer people in the United States seeking medical care, she said.
The EITF recently addressed the diversity in practice that exists among healthcare entities regarding the measurement of charity care for disclosure purposes (Issue No.
While a number of studies have been conducted to understand the personal motivations physicians have in choosing specialties and/or practice locations that involve caring for large proportions of underserved patients, few studies have looked closely at the physician population as a whole to assess the influence of economic factors on charity care provision (Li, Williams, and Scammon 1994; Miller, Hooker, and Mains 2006; Curlin et al.
The new health reform legislation addresses some of the charity care issues.
But it's clear that assessors will be reluctant to issue tax-exemption certificates until they see how much charity care those hospitals give.
A recent "Wall Street Journal" article showed how tax-exempt organizations were paying out what some consider inflated executive salaries while providing relatively little in terms of charity care or community benefit.
The percentage of doctors who provide charity care has dropped from about 76 percent a decade ago to 68 percent last year - a decline attributed to increasing health care costs and smaller reimbursements from insurance companies and HMOs.
Resurrection officials say all qualified patients, regardless of their immigration status, are eligible to receive charity care, and that additional documents are sometimes requested in an attempt to authenticate patients' identities.
For low-income, uninsured individuals who cannot afford to pay for their medical care, free care, also known as charity care, may be the only means to receive medical treatment.
The IRS argued the entity lacked effective control of the joint venture to provide continued charity care and significant private benefit was conferred to the for-profit partner (Wright & Stokeld, 2001).
ALso, HCPro has begun the publication of PFS Advisor, a monthly newsletter written to supply healthcare organizations and patient financial services (PFS) directors and managers information on revenue opportunities, charity care, developments in payer rules, collections and organization margins.