Greene and Greene

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Greene and Greene,

architectural firm working in the American arts and craftsarts and crafts,
term for that general field of applied design in which hand fabrication is dominant. The term was coined in England in the late 19th cent. as a label for the then-current movement directed toward the revivifying of the decorative arts.
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 style, formed by the brothers Charles Sumner Greene, 1868–1957, and Henry Mather Greene, 1870–1954, both b. Brighton (now part of Cincinnati), Ohio. Both attended Washington Univ.'s Manual Training High School and the Massachussets Institute of Technology's school of architecture (1886–88). After an apprenticeship in Boston, they joined their parents (1893), who had moved to Pasadena, Calif., and soon established (1894) their own firm. The bungalowbungalow
[Indian bangla,=house], dwelling built in a style developed from that of a form of rural house in India. The original bungalow typically has one story, few rooms, and a maximum of cross drafts, with high ceilings, unusually large window and door openings, and
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, the building style for which they became famous, was particularly well suited to the landscape, lifestyle, and climate of S California. Rather informal in feeling, these residences exhibit the handmade detailing and respect for materials characteristic of arts and crafts works. The brothers typically used wood members, overhanging roofs and eaves, sleeping porches, and spacious interiors. Their masterpiece is the David B. Gamble house (1908), Pasadena, in which landscaping, exterior features, and interior decoration are fully integrated. Other important buildings include the Pratt House in Ojai and the Thorsen House in Berkeley. Greene and Greene's work was influential in the design of American domestic architecture.

Bibliography

See studies by K. Current (1974), R. L. Makinson (2 vol., 1977–79; 1998), and B. Smith (1998).