Charles III


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Related to Charles III: Prince Charles, Charles III of England

Charles III,

king of Hungary: see Charles VICharles VI,
1685–1740, Holy Roman emperor (1711–40), king of Bohemia (1711–40) and, as Charles III, king of Hungary (1712–40); brother and successor of Holy Roman Emperor Joseph I. Charles was the last Holy Roman emperor of the direct Hapsburg line.
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, Holy Roman emperor.

Charles III,

1716–88, king of Spain (1759–88) and of Naples and Sicily (1735–59), son of Philip VPhilip V,
1683–1746, king of Spain (1700–1746), first Bourbon on the Spanish throne. A grandson of Louis XIV of France, he was titular duke of Anjou before Charles II of Spain designated him as his successor.
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 and Elizabeth FarneseElizabeth Farnese
, 1692–1766, queen of Spain, second consort of Philip V; niece of Antonio Farnese, duke of Parma. Soon after her marriage (1714), arranged by Cardinal Alberoni and the princesse des Ursins, she gained a strong influence over her weak husband and for some
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. Recognized as duke of Parma and Piacenza in 1731, he relinquished the duchies to Austria after Spain reconquered (1734) Naples and Sicily in the War of the Polish SuccessionPolish Succession, War of the,
1733–35. On the death (1733) of Augustus II of Poland, Stanislaus I sought to reascend the Polish throne. He was supported by his son-in-law, Louis XV of France.
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. His reign in Naples was beneficent. In 1759 he succeeded his half-brother, Ferdinand VIFerdinand VI,
b. 1712 or 1713, d. 1759, king of Spain (1746–59), son of Philip V by his first queen, Marie Louise of Savoy. When Ferdinand succeeded his father, his stepmother, Elizabeth Farnese, lost her power at court and went into retirement.
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, to the Spanish throne, Naples and Sicily passing to his third son, Ferdinand (later Ferdinand IFerdinand I,
1751–1825, king of the Two Sicilies (1816–25). He had previously been king of Naples (1759–99, 1799–1805, 1815–16) as Ferdinand IV and king of Sicily (1759–1816) as Ferdinand III.
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 of the Two Sicilies). Charles at first was neutral in the Seven Years WarSeven Years War,
1756–63, worldwide war fought in Europe, North America, and India between France, Austria, Russia, Saxony, Sweden, and (after 1762) Spain on the one side and Prussia, Great Britain, and Hanover on the other.
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, but after concluding the Family CompactFamily Compact,
several alliances between France and Spain in the form of agreements between the French and Spanish branches of the Bourbon family. The first of the three compacts, the Treaty of the Escorial (1733), was continued and extended by the second agreement (1743).
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 of 1761 with France, he involved Spain in the war in time to share France's defeat. By the Treaty of Paris of 1763 he ceded Florida to England but received Louisiana from France. Territorial disputes with Portugal in the Río de la Plata region were settled by the Treaty of San Ildefonso (1777). In the American Revolution, Charles entered (1779) the war on the American side and by the Treaty of Paris of 1783 regained Florida and Minorca. Spain prospered under the rule of Charles, who is regarded as the greatest Bourbon king of Spain and one of the "enlightened despots." His reign is noted for economic and administrative reforms and for the expulsion of the Jesuits (1767). Charles was ably assisted by ArandaAranda, Pedro Pablo Abarca de Bolea, conde de
, 1718–98, Spanish statesman. He distinguished himself at first as a military commander, serving as director-general of artillery and captain general of Valencia and later of Aragón.
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, FloridablancaFloridablanca or Florida Blanca, José Moñino, conde de
, 1728–1808, Spanish statesman. After the expulsion of the Jesuits from Spain (1767), he was sent to Rome as ambassador to obtain the papal
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, Campomanes, and Jovellanos. He was succeeded by his son Charles IVCharles IV,
1748–1819, king of Spain (1788–1808), second son of Charles III, whom he succeeded in place of his imbecile older brother. Unlike his father, Charles IV was an ineffective ruler and in 1792 virtually surrendered the government to Godoy, his chief minister
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.

Charles III

(Charles of Durazzo), 1345–86, king of Naples (1381–86) and, as Charles II, of Hungary (1385–86); great-grandson of Charles II of Naples. Adopted as a child by Joanna IJoanna I,
1326–82, queen of Naples (1343–81), countess of Provence. She was the granddaughter of King Robert of Naples, whom she succeeded with her husband, Andrew of Hungary.
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 of Naples, he later lived at the court of Louis I of Hungary. In 1380, Pope Urban VI summoned Charles to dethrone Joanna because of her support of the antipope, Clement IV; Joanna repudiated Charles as her heir in favor of Louis of Anjou (see Louis ILouis I,
1339–84, king of Naples (1382–84; rival claimant to Charles III), duke of Anjou, count of Provence, second son of John II of France. He founded the second Angevin line in Naples. As a regent for his nephew, Charles VI of France, he was noted for his rapacity.
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, king of Naples). Charles conquered Naples, imprisoned Joanna, and was crowned (1381) by the pope. Joanna died by his order. Charles repulsed attacks on Naples by Louis of Anjou. In 1385, elected king of Hungary over SigismundSigismund
, 1368–1437, Holy Roman emperor (1433–37), German king (1410–37), king of Hungary (1387–1437) and of Bohemia (1419–37), elector of Brandenburg (1376–1415), son of Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV.
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, Charles was crowned but was soon assassinated. He was succeeded in Naples by his son, Lancelot, and in Hungary by Sigismund.

Charles III

(Charles the Good), 1361–1425, king of Navarre (1387–1425), count of Évreux; son and successor of Charles II. He settled (1404) his inherited differences with France and later tried to negotiate between the Armagnacs and Burgundians. His reign was peaceful and beneficent. His daughter Blanche and her husband, John (later John II of Aragón), succeeded him.

Charles III

or

Charles the Fat,

French king: see Charles IIICharles III
or Charles the Fat,
839–88, emperor of the West (881–87), king of the East Franks (882–87), and king of the West Franks (884–87); son of Louis the German, at whose death he inherited Swabia (876).
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, emperor of the West.

Charles III

(Charles the Simple), 879–929, French king (893–923), son of King Louis II (Louis the Stammerer). As a child he was excluded from the succession at the death (884) of his half-brother Carloman and at the deposition (887) of King Charles IIICharles III
or Charles the Fat,
839–88, emperor of the West (881–87), king of the East Franks (882–87), and king of the West Franks (884–87); son of Louis the German, at whose death he inherited Swabia (876).
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 (Charles the Fat), who succeeded Carloman. Instead, EudesEudes
or Odo
, c.860–898, count of Paris, French king (888–898). The son of Robert the Strong, he was an antecedent of the Capetian royal house in France.
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, count of Paris, succeeded Charles the Fat. In 893, however, Charles was crowned by a party of nobles and prelates and became sole king at the death of Eudes in 898. He put an end to Norse raids by the Treaty of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte (911), ceding to the Norse leader Rollo part of the territory later known as Normandy, and in 911 Charles acquired Lorraine. In 922 some of the barons revolted and crowned Robert I, brother of Eudes, king. In 923, at the battle of Soissons, Robert was killed, but Charles was defeated. RaoulRaoul
, d. 936, duke of Burgundy, king of France (923–36). Elected king to succeed his father-in-law, Robert I, Raoul fought the Normans and the Hungarians, who repeatedly invaded France.
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 of Burgundy was elected king, and Charles was imprisoned.

Charles III

or

Charles the Fat,

839–88, emperor of the West (881–87), king of the East Franks (882–87), and king of the West Franks (884–87); son of Louis the GermanLouis the German,
c.804–876, king of the East Franks (817–76). When his father, Emperor of the West Louis I, partitioned the empire in 817, Louis received Bavaria and adjacent territories.
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, at whose death he inherited Swabia (876). He succeeded to the East Frankish or German kingship after the deaths of his brothers Carloman (880) and Louis the Younger (882), with whom he had shared the kingdom of Louis the German. He had also gained Italy from Carloman and was crowned emperor by Pope John VIII in 881. After the death of the heirs of Charles IICharles II
or Charles the Bald,
823–77, emperor of the West (875–77) and king of the West Franks (843–77); son of Emperor Louis I by a second marriage.
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 in France, he became (884) West Frankish king, thus reuniting briefly the empire of Charlemagne. A weak ruler, he was unable to protect his lands from invasion and in 886, when he went to relieve Paris, which was besieged by the NorsemenNorsemen,
name given to the Scandinavian Vikings who raided and settled on the coasts of the European continent in the 9th and 10th cent. They are also referred to as Northmen or Normans.
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, he ransomed the city instead of fighting and allowed the invaders to ravage Burgundy. He was deposed in 887 and was succeeded in Germany by ArnulfArnulf
, c.850–899, Carolingian emperor (896–99), king of the East Franks (887–99), illegitimate son of Carloman of Bavaria. In 887 he led the rebellion of the kingdom of the East Franks (Germany) against his uncle, Carolingian Emperor Charles III, and was
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 and briefly in France by EudesEudes
or Odo
, c.860–898, count of Paris, French king (888–898). The son of Robert the Strong, he was an antecedent of the Capetian royal house in France.
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.

Charles III

 

(known as Charles the Fat). Born in 839; died Jan. 13, 888, in Neidingen. Ruler of the East Frankish and West Frankish kingdoms (876– and December 884–, respectively); king of all the East Franks (881–887).

Charles III was the son of Louis the German. He temporarily unified under his rule the territory of the former empire of Charlemagne. In 887 he was deposed by insurgent feudal lords.

Charles III

1. known as Charles the Fat. 839--888 ad, Holy Roman Emperor (881--887) and, as Charles II, king of France (884--887). He briefly reunited the empire of Charlemagne
2. 1716--88, king of Spain (1759--88), who curbed the power of the Church and tried to modernize his country
References in periodicals archive ?
He said: "I finished playing Hercule Poirot 18 months ago and since then I think I have been offered six or seven different plays and I passed on all of them but I said yes to King Charles III and that tells its own story.
Not quite serious, not quite suffi-ciently comical, King Charles III is pitched in a curious no man's land.
Robert Powell as King Charles III, Ben Righton as William and Jennifer Bryden as Kate
King Charles III September 4-19 This Mike Bartlett play, which recently won an Olivier Award, opens the season after its West End run.
the winners |Best New Play:King Charles III by Mike Bartlett | The Peter Hepple Award for Best Musical (new or revival): Gypsy Best Actor: | Mark Strong in A View From The Bridge |Best Actress:Helen McCrory in Medea (Olivier Theatre at the National, London) | The John and Wendy Trewin Award for Best Shakespearean Performance: Antony Sher in Henry IV Parts I & II Best Director: | Ivo van Hove for A View From The Bridge |Best Designer:Paul Barritt for Golem and Es Devlin for The Nether | Most Promising Playwright: Barney Norris for Visitors The Jack Tinker Award for Most Promising Newcomer (other than a playwright): Patsy Ferran in Blithe Spirit and Treasure Island
He argues persuasively that from the early sixteenth century to the mid-eighteenth century, creoles and peninsulars collaborated and commingled at least as much as they competed, and that the purported conflict between the two groups was a late development, belonging mainly to the era of Ferdinand VI, Charles III, and Charles IV.
that the Stuarts, doomed to failure and exile, were reactionaries, bigots (James III provided an Anglican chapel for visiting Englishmen and Charles III left Rome for Canterburyu) and bores.
If Her Majesty lives as long as her mother, then Charles - already the longest king-in-waiting in British history - will be well into his seventies before he becomes King Charles III (or George VII, as many predict he will call himself, in honour of his grandfather).
It continues through radial roads invented by Ferdinand VI and promoted by Charles III, the railway in the middle 19th century, and motorways of the 20th century, to the high-speed trains and air transportation today.
In due course, we will have King Charles III and Queen Camilla, hardly an inviting prospect.
Survivors include his wife; three sons, Charles III and Richard, both of Eugene, and John of Cres well; a daughter, Catherine Larson of Eugene; a brother, Richard of Silver Spring, Md.
In 1762 Louis XV gave Louisiana to his Spanish cousin King Charles III, however Spanish rule was relatively short, lasting only until around 1800.