Charles IX


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Related to Charles IX: Francis II, Mary Queen of Scots, Catherine de Medici

Charles IX,

1550–74, king of France. He succeeded (1560) his brother Francis IIFrancis II,
1768–1835, last Holy Roman emperor (1792–1806), first emperor of Austria as Francis I (1804–35), king of Bohemia and of Hungary (1792–1835).
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 under the regency of his mother, Catherine de' MediciCatherine de' Medici
, 1519–89, queen of France, daughter of Lorenzo de' Medici, duke of Urbino. She was married (1533) to the duc d'Orléans, later King Henry II.
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. She retained her influence throughout his reign. After 1570, however, Charles was temporarily under the sway of the French Huguenot leader Gaspard de ColignyColigny, Gaspard de Châtillon, comte de
, 1519–72, French Protestant leader. A nephew of Anne, duc de Montmorency, he came to the French court at an early age.
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. Catherine, fearing for her power, persuaded her weak son to approve the massacre of Saint Bartholomew's DaySaint Bartholomew's Day, massacre of,
murder of French Protestants, or Huguenots, that began in Paris on Aug. 24, 1572. It was preceded, on Aug. 22, by an attempt, ordered by Catherine de' Medici, on the life of the Huguenot leader Admiral Coligny.
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 in which Coligny and thousands of other Huguenots were murdered. Charles IX was succeeded by his brother Henry IIIHenry III,
1551–89, king of France (1574–89); son of King Henry II and Catherine de' Medici. He succeeded his brother, Charles IX. As a leader of the royal army in the Wars of Religion (see Religion, Wars of) against the French Protestants, or Huguenots, Henry, then
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.

Charles IX,

1550–1611, king of Sweden (1604–11), youngest son of Gustavus I. He was duke of Södermanland, Närke, and Värmland before his accession. During the reign of his brother, John III (1568–92), he opposed John's leanings toward Catholicism. After John's death he acted as regent, summoned (1593) an assembly of clergy and nobles to Uppsala, and had it establish Lutheranism as the state religion. This measure was passed in anticipation of the arrival (1594) of John III's Catholic son and heir, King Sigismund IIISigismund III,
1566–1632, king of Poland (1587–1632) and Sweden (1592–99). The son of John III of Sweden and Catherine, sister of Sigismund II of Poland, he united the Vasa and Jagiello dynasties.
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 of Poland, who was obliged to pledge himself to uphold Protestantism in Sweden as a condition for his coronation. Sigismund left Sweden in the same year, and Charles summoned the Riksdag, was made regent against the king's wishes, and ousted all Catholic officials. The Swedish nobles were loyal to Sigismund, but the people supported Charles. Sigismund landed an army at Kalmar (1598), was defeated by Charles at Stangebro, and was deposed by the Riksdag in 1599. To consolidate his power Charles had most of his opponents executed, but he refused to accept the Swedish crown until Sigismund's brother, John, renounced it in 1604. In 1600 he invaded Livonia and thus began the long Polish-Swedish wars that ended only with the Peace of OlivaOliva, Peace of
, 1660, treaty signed at Oliva (now a suburb of Gdańsk) by Poland and Sweden. John II of Poland renounced the theoretical claim of his line to the Swedish crown, which his father, Sigismund III, had in practice lost in 1599.
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 in 1660. Charles's claim to Lapland involved him in the unsuccessful Kalmar War (1611–13) with Christian IVChristian IV,
1577–1648, king of Denmark and Norway (1588–1648), son and successor of Frederick II. After assuming (1596) personal rule from a regency, he concentrated on building the navy, industry, and commerce. He rebuilt Oslo and renamed it Christiania.
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 of Denmark. He died before the conclusion of the war and was succeeded by his son, Gustavus II.

Charles IX

1550--74, king of France (1560--74), son of Catherine de' Medici and Henry II: his reign was marked by war between Huguenots and Catholics
References in periodicals archive ?
The first four scenes provide the massacre's immediate context, while the first half of scene thirteen provides the only staging of its aftermath, in the form of the death of a guilt-stricken Charles ix.
Charles IX died in 1574 and was succeeded by his brother, the due d'Anjou, who now became Henri III.
The rhetoric of forgetting that Henri takes up from Charles IX and Henri III is proof of the king's quasi-divine capacity to dispense grace.
After the sudden death of her husband Henri II and eldest son Francois II, Catherine de Medicis was able to transform her identity as a wife, widow, and mother into political agency as regent for Charles IX.
Named duc de Nevers in 1565, Gonzaga acted as an important advisor to Charles IX and Henri III, advocating the suppression of heresy, supporting the Saint Bartholomew's Day Massacre, and promoting the early Catholic Reformation within France.
Bruno Petey-Girard shows that even funeral orations for famous figures, such as Mary Stuart or Charles IX, are subject to rhetoric and often celebrate the life of the speaker rather than the deceased.
The Sonnets de Monsieur de Magny were composed for the young Charles IX between his sacre in May 1561 and Magny's death in June or July of that year.
Although only her brother Charles IX, who died when she was twenty-one, employed the nickname, it lives on, due to Dumas's 1845 melodrama, La Reine Margot, reprised in Patrice Chereau's film of 1994.
Indeed, much like the English Parliament was brought into the policy-making process by Henry VIII during the Reformation, so was the Parlement of Paris brought more into policy-making negotiations in France by Charles IX and Henry III as a result of debating the various peace edicts that ended each of the religious wars.
The book contains fascinating passages on, among other things, the entrance of Charles IX into the fortress of La Rochelle during his royal tour of France in 1562, the devastating siege of La Rochelle in 1627-28, John Winthrop, Jr.
Let us turn to Elizabeth of Austria's lament at the death of her husband, Charles IX (d.
Conti hesitated whether to dedicate the 1567 edition of his work to Emperor Maximilian II or to the French king Charles IX, finally deciding on the latter.