Charles Koechlin


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Koechlin, Charles

 

Born Nov. 27, 1867, in Paris; died Dec. 31, 1950, in Le Rayol-Canadel-sur-Mer, Var Department. French composer, musicologist, and public figure.

In 1897, Koechlin graduated from the Paris Conservatory, where he was a student of J. Massenet and G. Fauré. Among his compositions are operas, ballets, symphonic and instrumental chamber music, piano pieces, and art songs, as well as choral works, including Libérons Thaelmann for chorus and orchestra (1934). He was a prominent figure in the Popular Music Federation, one of the founders of the society France-USSR, and chairman of the latter’s music section. Koechlin wrote works on the theory and history of music and also taught. (His pupils included the composers F. Poulenc and H. Sauguet.)

REFERENCES

Shneerson, G. Frantsuzskaia muzyka XX veka, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1970.
Renaudin, P. C. Koechlin. (Notice biobibliographique.) Paris, 1952.
References in periodicals archive ?
A group of songs by Charles Koechlin follows, including his unforgettable, "Si tu le veux.
Charles Koechlin, for example, speculated that "the most probable parents of Pelleas are Boris Godunov and Le Rhte" (p.
Le Portrait de Daisy Hamilton, Opus 140, Volumes 1 and 2, by Charles Koechlin, edited and arranged for piano by Robert Orledge.
On one she partners cellist Yo Yo Main a French recital (Sony), another is a solo recital of the Frenchmen Charles Koechlin (Chandos) and a third is entitled Hot Music by Erwin Schulhoff.
After the death of the organist Charles Shatto on New Year's Day 1983, the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) inherited a substantial collection of manuscripts by Shatto himself, his wife Catherine Urner (1891-1942), and their composition teacher and mentor, Charles Koechlin (1867-1950).
The highlight of chapter 6, "Polytonality, Counterpoint, and Instrumentation," is Kelly's emphasis on the often-overlooked composer Charles Koechlin, whom she credits with inspiring Milhaud to grant instrumentation a crucial role in the polytonal juxtaposition of horizontal lines.
Robert Orledge addresses the knotty topic of Ravel's "exotic" (he is eminently qualified, of course; recall his fine studies of Debussy and Charles Koechlin: Debussy and the Theatre [Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1982] and Charles Koechlin (1867-1950): His Life and Works [Chur, Switzerland and New York: Harwood Academic Publishers, 1989]).
He notes that Charles Koechlin is "coming into his own with the public as a composer of real individuality" (p.
Serge Diaghilev's Ballets Russes puts in an appearance only at the very end, and Camille Saint-Saens (who was just as reactionary and opinionated as d'Indy) and Charles Koechlin (another important independent and SMI activist) receive no more than passing mention.
2), although it could be argued that Charles Koechlin, Erik Satie, and Francis Poulenc were musically and aesthetically closer to him.
Yet a host of worthy French composers still await scholarly rediscovery, including such figures as Paul Dukas, Charles Koechlin, Jean Roger-Ducasse, Florent Schmitt, and the author of this collection of writings.
However as a young man Sauguet was irresistibly drawn to Paris, where he studied privately with Charles Koechlin.