Château d'If

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Château d'If

(shätō'dēf`), castle built in 1524 on the small rocky isle of If, in the Mediterranean Sea off Marseilles, SE France. Long used as a state prison, it was made famous by Alexandre Dumas's Count of Monte Cristo.
References in classic literature ?
As usual, a pilot put off immediately, and rounding the Chateau d'If, got on board the vessel between Cape Morgion and Rion island.
History buffs should take a ferry to the Chateau d'If, a notorious prison which was once home to the "Man In the Iron Mask".
5m [pounds sterling]--even more than Cezanne's Vue sur L'Estaque et le Chateau d'If of around 1883-85, illustrated in the February Apollo (13.
And from the city you can see a small island which is home to the Chateau d'if, the prison which held Alexander Dumas' The Count of Monte Cristo.
You're right by the beach, but only a 20-minute drive from the city, so it's handy for the sight of Chateau d'If and there's also some great shopping, eating and drinking nearby (the world's best rose wines are right here).
We couldn't leave Marseille without a boat trip to the legendary Chateau D'If - of Count of Monte Cristo fame - and a hearty bowl of bouillabaisse by the twinkling lights of the harbour after dark.
From this eagle's nest, look south across the sea and you'll spot the Chateau d'If, the island prison that inspired Alexandre Dumas' novel The Count of Monte Cristo.
In 2002, the 400 year-old Comino Tower, built to deter pirates, represented the Chateau d'If in the movie The Count of Monte Cristo.
The story revolves around hapless Edmond Dantes (Caviezel), who is falsely imprisoned in the legendary island prison Chateau D'If, for allegedly carrying a message from Napoleon.
Banged up for life on trumped-up treason charges in the infamous Chateau D'If, Edmond can only dream of vengeance.
Edmond is promptly thrown into the notorious island prison Chateau D'If, where he is left to rot for 15 years.
The recent Bravo miniseries with Gerard Depardieu had more suspense, sex and character complexity, but the new movie has the advantage of being in English and gives special attention to the Abbe Faria (Richard Harris), the wise priest and fellow-prisoner who befriends Dantes at Chateau d'If.