Chaucer

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Chaucer

Geoffrey. ?1340--1400, English poet, noted for his narrative skill, humour, and insight, particularly in his most famous work, The Canterbury Tales. He was influenced by the continental tradition of rhyming verse. His other works include Troilus and Criseyde, The Legende of Good Women, and The Parlement of Foules
References in periodicals archive ?
Te Chaucerian presumption was reformulated as the thieves', to teach a lesson to the error of challenging right order.
Learning to be attentive to those broader movements through the rich reception history of the Chaucerian text is an important way for modern readers to repair the 'injuries of time'.
Chaucerian ideals of patience and mercy exist against the backdrop of an angry world, but not just as solutions or reme dies for anger.
The question of the caesura and the virgule as authoritatively Chaucerian is much debated.
There are some 720 entries arranged alphabetically and these include entries for Chaucer's works, the most important fictional characters, writers who influenced Chaucer or were influenced by him, people and places important in Chaucer's life and works, 'relevant genres and literary traditions (rhyme royal, dream vision, beast fable, etc)', the most important manuscripts and editions of his works, the leading Chaucerian scholars and editors (up to 1950) and those historical, social or political events which are relevant to a full understanding of Chaucer.
John Bowers, on the other hand, has suggested that one particularly Chaucerian aspect of the Prologue is precisely that it requires a reading of its Pardoner as an anatomical or spiritual eunuch, as Chaucer's own Pardoner is for such earlier critics as Curry and Miller (Bowers 1985, 30; Curry 1960; Miller 1955).
3) In a perversely telling moment, the professional Chaucerian will note the odd similarity between Heath Ledger's "Sir William Thatcher" (AKA Sir Ulrich Von Lichenstein of Gelderland, real identity quite possibly unknown) and Chaucer's repellent and equally nameless Knight (who also lacks a reasonably believable history, pedigree, and heraldic existence).
Laura Kendrick in her book Chaucerian Play: Comedy and Control in the "Canterbury Tales," explores many interesting questions as to why Chaucer's writing moves "toward laughter" (Kendrick 1988, 14).
Even that titular exclamation mark tests you--are we to think of a Chaucerian exhortation, "Go, litel boke
Anderson takes us on a kind of Chaucerian pilgrimage toward that future by presenting the tales of some pilgrims who are priests and their lovers and some other friends.
43) David Wallace, Chaucerian Polity: Absolutist Lineages and Associational Forms in England and Italy, Stanford University Press, Stanford, 1997, 80.
13) Thus, she applies Chaucerian intertextuality to anthologies containing fabliaux and insinuates a question--is it possible that Chaucer "knew and aimed to mimic .