Chautauquan

Chautauquan

[shə′täk·wən]
(geology)
Upper Devonian geologic time, below Bradfordian.
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References in periodicals archive ?
See generally de Coubertin, Le retablissement des jeux olympiques, Revue de Paris, at 170 (June 15, 1894), translated and reprinted in The Re-essablishment of the Olympic Games, 19 The Chautauquan 696 (1894).
During the 1996 season, a group called Student Ventures sponsored by a group of conservative Christians named "Chautauquans for a Christian Focus," ran an ad in The Daily Chautauquan announcing "Gestapo Night.
Among Jewish Chautauquans, the Fradins are legendary as the first Jewish couple to make the leap from renters to owners.
Like Jewish Chautauquans before them, they didn't just hang out with other Jews.
An 1896 publication in a mainstream periodical, the Chautauquan, Fong's history pays particular attention to the then major unions, those of the laundrymen, cigarmakers, shoemakers, jean-clothes tailors, and makers of ladies underwear.
In 1882 she moved back to Pennsylvania and a year later took a position with The Chautauquan, a monthly magazine.
Fong (Kuang Huatai; Kum Ngon Fong) on Chinese labor guilds, or as the author preferred to call them, Chinese labor unions, was first published in Chautauquan, vol.
Another story, from the 1897 Chautauquan, tested readers' expectations about the reach of Thanksgiving's powers to convert.
The Chautauquan, published from 1880 until 1914 for men and women enrolled in the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle, enjoyed "wide circulation" by 1885, when more than 20,000 people each year enrolled in the CLSC (3: 173, 544).
Indeed, Bryan, who had always been interested in progressive communities as a Chautauquan, had undergone a conversion toward American Transcendentalism and attracted hundreds to his bible class each week at Coconut Grove's Royal Palm Park.